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Biological corrosion

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Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003556
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... coatings designed to prevent wear or corrosion in an operating system, or the alteration of flow regimes and heat-transfer coefficients due to the biological fouling of metal surfaces. Given the potential impact of MIC on a wide range of industrial operations, it is not surprising that microbiological...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006788
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract This article focuses on the mechanisms of microbiologically influenced corrosion as a basis for discussion on the diagnosis, management, and prevention of biological corrosion failures in piping, tanks, heat exchangers, and cooling towers. It begins with an overview of the scope...
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 13 Anaerobic biological corrosion of cast iron. (a) Cast iron pipe section exhibiting external pitting caused by bacteria. (b) Cast iron pipe showing penetration by bacteria-induced pitting corrosion. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 16 Localized biological corrosion of austenitic stainless steel. (a) Crevice corrosion of type 304 stainless steel flange from a cooling water system. Staining shows evidence of adjacent biomounds. The corrosion attack reached a depth of 6 mm ( 1 4 in.). Courtesy of W.K. Link More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Rate of corrosion of unprotected steel in biologically active soil as a function of iron sulfide present More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003637
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... of the documented cases in which biological organisms are the sole cause of, or an accelerating factor in, corrosion involve localized forms of attack. One reason for this is that organisms usually do not form in a continuous film on the metal surface. Additional information on biofilms can be found in the section...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004105
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... of biological fouling organisms take place directly at the metal/water interface where the corrosion occurs, not in the bulk water. This means that the chemical environment in which the corrosion reactions occur in the presence of a micro- or macrofouling film may bear little resemblance to that of the bulk...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004207
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
.... The article illustrates the interfacial structure of a biomaterial surface contacting with the biological environment. It describes the corrosion behavior of stainless steel, cobalt-base alloy, and titanium alloys. The electrochemical methods used for studying metallic biomaterials corrosion are also...
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 5 Rate of corrosion for steel sustained over a six-week period in biologically active, wet, high-clay soil as a function of iron sulfide present under anaerobic conditions in laboratory tests. SRB, sulfate-reducing bacteria More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004106
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... of corrosion standards proposed by the International Standards Organization (ISO). This article focuses on the important variables associated with atmospheric corrosion in marine atmospheres, namely, moisture, temperature, winds, airborne contaminants, alloy content, location, and biological organisms along...
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 18 Cracks emanating from pits in a type 304 stainless steel tank that was placed in hot demineralized water service with an operating temperature that fluctuated from 75 to 90 °C (165 to 195 °F). (a) Micrograph of a section through a typical biological deposit and pit in the wall More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004208
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract This article provides information on biomedical aspects such as active biological responses and the chemical environment characterizing the internal physiological milieu, as well as electrochemical fundamentals needed for characterizing corrosion fatigue (CF) and stress-corrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006909
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
...., alkalis and acids), ionizing radiation, and biological degradation, along with the combined effects of mechanical stress, temperature, and moisture (including environmental stress corrosion). The article also includes information on the use of accelerated testing for predicting material property...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005659
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... ), such as heparin, an anticoagulant. Materials The number of materials used in currently approved implant devices is relatively small because of the requirement for stability in the biological milieu (resistance to corrosion and degradation) and minimal inflammation in the local tissue response, in addition...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006059
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... amine-cured epoxy coatings. Fig. 5 Concrete attack in sewer. Courtesy of Corrosion Probe, Inc. Secondary Treatment Secondary treatment mainly involves biological treatment of wastewater. Currently, the most extensively used biological processes involve suspended-growth biological...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005666
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... addresses the biologic aspects of implant debris, both locally and systemically. It describes debris-induced local effects, particle-induced proinflammatory responses, and debris-induced systemic effects. The article concludes with a discussion on the four systemic effects of implant debris, namely...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005665
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Mechanism of Ion Release Various bearing materials release different metallic ions in biological environments. Cobalt-chromium alloys release ions through crevice corrosion, pitting corrosion, or uniform dissolution. Mechanical corrosion, which disrupts the passive layer, can also precipitate...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006889
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... between electroanalytical techniques, biological-based testing, and tribological characterization is needed and has been performed. This form of testing is done using an electrochemical (corrosion) cell, a potentiostat, a tribometer, and in-vitro-based media. Some tests are idle; that is, no potential...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005655
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... defined by Williams as “non-viable materials used in a medical device, intended to interact with biological systems” ( Ref 1 ). Ceramics used in such biological applications are commonly referred to as bioceramics. History of Bioceramics Biocompatibility has been defined by Williams as “the ability...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004104
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... the piping system that transports the wastewater to the treatment facility are discussed. The article describes the corrosion performance of various materials in the soil, fluid, and atmospheric exposures. These include concrete, steel, ductile iron, aluminum, copper, brass, stainless steel, and coatings...