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Auger electron spectroscopy

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Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001770
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
... Abstract This article describes the principles and applications of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). It provides information on the instrumentation typically used in the AES, including an electron gun, an electron spectrometer, a secondary electron detector, and an ion gun. The article also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0006657
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
... Abstract This article discusses the basic principles of and chemical effects in Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), covering various factors affecting the quantitative analyses of AES. The discussion covers instrumentation and sophisticated electronics typically used in AES for data acquisition...
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 1 Auger electron spectroscopy secondary-electron image with a 5 μm field of view (FOV) of the nickel surface after removal of approximately 12 nm of surface contamination More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 1 Auger electron spectroscopy depth profile of polished aluminum alloy 2024-T3 solid solution matrix exposed to Alodine 1200S conversion coating solution for 5 min. Sputter rate approximately 300 Å/min (vs. SiO 2 ). Experiment details in Ref 7 . Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 2 Auger electron spectroscopy depth profile of polished aluminum alloy 2024-T3 solid solution matrix exposed for 5 min to the same solution as in Fig. 1 without fluoride ion present. Sputter rate approximately 300 Å/min (vs. SiO 2 ). Experiment details in Ref 7 . Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 5 Auger electron spectroscopy of a TiN coating in the derivative mode. At 383 eV, one of the major titanium peaks overlaps with the nitrogen (381 eV) peak. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 6 Factor analysis in Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling of an oxidized (Cr,Pd)N coating. (a) Standard spectra of the components chromium nitride and chromium oxide. (b) Comparison of measured and synthesized spectra. (c) Depth profile of the principal components. Source: Ref 12 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 5 Auger electron spectroscopy depth profile of a type 316L stainless steel surface. The exposed metal surface is on the left, and the composition with depth from the surface changes as one moves to the right. The base metal composition is reached at approximately 12.5 nm, or 35 atoms More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 Auger electron spectroscopy survey spectra obtained from features observed in secondary electron microscopy photo of stainless steel ( Fig. 1 ). Point 1, large particle feature near center of Fig. 3 . Point 2, small particle feature. Point 3, control point off of defects More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 3 Auger electron spectroscopy map of calcium contamination on stainless steel surface. Field of view, 1 μm More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 2 Auger electron spectroscopy spectra of single-crystal aluminum pin surfaces. (a) Chemically polished surface; 3 keV electron beam. (b) Argon ion sputter-cleaned surface; 3 keV electron beam More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 3 Auger electron spectroscopy spectra of single-crystal sapphire flat surfaces. (a) As-received surface; 2 keV electron beam. (b) Argon ion sputter-cleaned surface; 3 keV electron beam More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 15 Typical Auger electron spectroscopy spectrum showing the surface composition for a passivated stainless steel surface More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 16 Auger electron spectroscopy depth composition profiles for a stainless steel surface (a) before passivation and (b) after chemical passivation. The ratio of chromium to iron is higher near the surface after passivation, which is consistent with the presence of a passive chromium oxide More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 19 Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiles of carbon-beryllium reactions. (a) As-deposited 200 nm carbon on beryllium substrate and after vacuum heating at (b) 450 °C (840 °F) for 30 min, (c) 550 °C (1020 °F) for 30 min, and (d) 600 °C (1110 °F) for 30 min. TZ, transition zone More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 21 Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiles from Nb-SiC couples in the as-deposited condition and upon vacuum annealing at various temperatures and times. Source: Ref 61 More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 22 (a) Auger electron spectroscopy depth-profile measurement of Nb-SiC sample annealed at 1200 °C (2190 °F) for 2 h. (b) Silicon and (c) carbon Auger peak shapes at various sputter times (depths) in the profile, showing chemical-state changes. Source: Ref 61 More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 33 Auger electron spectroscopy analysis of an in situ fractured low-alloy steel showing (a) ferrite-ferrite boundaries with antimony and nickel enrichment, (b) ferrite-ferrite boundaries with no enrichment of antimony and nickel, (c) chromium-rich carbides, and (d) chromium sulfides More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 40 Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiles from bond pads of (a) a contaminated chip and (b) a nominal chip. Estimated sputter rate is ~2 nm/min. Courtesy of Physical Electronics, USA More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 43 Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiles. (a) As-deposited 150 nm molybdenum and 150 nm gold films on silicon. (b) Same films after 450 °C (840 °F) anneal for 30 min. (c) Nitrided molybdenum and gold films after similar heat treatments. Source: Ref 111 More