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Aluminum bronze

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Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 7 Martensite in metastable β′-phase aluminum bronze. (a) Martensite needles in Cu-11.8wt%Al alloy homogenized at 800 °C (1472 °F) and water quenched. (b) Martensite running from bottom right to top left. Cu-11.8wt%Al alloy is heated to 900 °C (1650 °F), held for 1 h, and water quenched More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 4 Cast aluminum bronze (Cu-10Al-5Mo-5Fe), annealed and furnace cooled. Alpha needles in a pearlitic matrix of kappa and alpha. The small points are rosettes and rods of kappa, a quarterly phase of CuAlNiFe. Acid etched in ferric chloride. Original magnification 400×. Courtesy of Frauke More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 38 Naval Research Laboratories-type riser curve for aluminum bronze (alloy C95300) using different types of exothermic hot topping and top risers. Source: Ref 34 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 43 Dealuminification of a cast aluminum bronze furnace electrode pressure ring exposed to recirculating cooling water (pH = 7.8 to 8.3, conductivity = 1000 to 1100 μS). The preferentially attacked γ phase left behind a residue of copper (darkened regions in eutectoid and along grain More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 5 Aluminum bronze (ASTM B 148, grade 9C) heat treated to form Al 4 Cu 9 . Pre-etched with aqueous 10% (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 and color etched with Beraha's lead sulfide reagent. 500×. (G.F. Vander Voort) More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 21 Cu-11.8Al (aluminum bronze), heat treated, with martensite in the microstructure. (a) Bright-field illumination. (b) Dark-field illumination. (c) Differential interference-contrast illumination. (d) Crossed polarized light illumination. As-polished. 200× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 47 Alloy C95400 (aluminum bronze), solution treated 2 h at 900 °C (1650 °F), water quenched, tempered 2 h at 650 °C (1200 °F), and water quenched. Alpha grains (white martensitic needles) are smaller than in the as-cast condition. Etchant 4, Table 2 . 200× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 48 Alloy C95500 (aluminum bronze with 11.5% Al), as sand cast. Small α grains (light gray, mottled) in matrix of retained β phase (white), with same eutectoid decomposed β phase (dark gray). Compare with Figure 49 . Electrolytically etched in electrolyte 5, Table 5 . 250× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 49 Alloy C95500 (aluminum bronze with 11.0% Al), with larger α grains and a greater amount of eutectoid decomposed β phase in the matrix than Figure 48 . Electrolytically etched in electrolyte 5, Table 5 . 250× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 50 Metal mold cast aluminum bronze casting. Alloy contains 5% Ni and 5% Fe (similar to C95500). Under slow cooling, the laminar Widmänstatten structure (light) is visible on a background of fine martensitic structure (dark). Etchant not reported. 100×. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 51 Cast aluminum bronze (11.8% Al). Under faster cooling than Figure 50 specimen, the structure has been transformed, with the formation of martensitic needles mixed with pearlite (trostite). Etchant not reported. 50×. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 43 Dealuminification of a cast aluminum bronze furnace electrode pressure ring exposed to recirculating cooling water (pH = 7.8 to 8.3, conductivity = 1000 to 1100 μS). The preferentially attacked γ phase left behind a residue of copper (darkened regions in eutectoid and along grain More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 6 Different phases in nickel-aluminum bronzes. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006281
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... Abstract Bronzes generally are used to describe many different copper-base alloys in which the major alloying addition is neither zinc nor nickel. They are generally classified by their major alloying elements, for example, tin bronzes with phosphorus used as a deoxidizer, aluminum bronzes...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003134
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... for that quality in a casting alloy. Foundry alloys generally are classified as high-shrinkage or low-shrinkage alloys. The former class includes the manganese bronzes, aluminum bronzes, silicon bronzes, silicon brasses, and some nickel silvers. They are more fluid than the low-shrinkage red brasses, more...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005332
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... that the removed metal forms chips rather than metal ribbons that foul the tool bits. Aluminum The solubility of aluminum in copper is limited to 9%. Aluminum improves the strength of copper, so high-strength copper alloys, such as aluminum bronzes and high-strength yellow brasses, contain significant...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001068
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
... C95200 Aluminum bronze B 148-9A 88 … … … 3 9 … C95300 Aluminum bronze B 148-9B 89 … … … 1 10 … C95400 Aluminum bronze B 148-9C 85.5 … … … 4 10.5 … C95410 Aluminum bronze … 84 … … … 4 10 2 Ni C95500 Nickel-aluminum bronze B 148-9D 81 … … … 4 11 4 Ni...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005444
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... Cupro-nickel, 30% 0.07 Cupro-nickel, 10% 0.095 Nickel silver, 65-18 0.08 Nickel silver, 55-18 0.07 Nickel silver, 65-12 0.10 High-silicon bronze (A) 0.09 Low-silicon bronze (B) 0.14 Aluminum bronze, 5% Al 0.198 Aluminum bronze, (3) 0.18 Aluminum-silicon bronze 0.108...
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 7 Temperature distribution in high-speed steel tools in cutting 60/40 brass (a), low-carbon steel (b), and CA 104 aluminum bronze (10% Al, 5% Fe, 5% Ni) (c). The proximity of the high-temperature region to the cutting edge is the reason aluminum bronzes are considered difficult to machine More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001438
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...-aluminum alloys (aluminum bronzes) , which contain up to 10% Al Copper-silicon alloys (silicon bronzes) , which contain up to 3% Si Copper-nickel alloys , which contain up to 30% Ni Copper-zinc-nickel alloys (nickel silvers) , which contain up to 27% Zn and 18% Ni Special alloys , which...