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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004184
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... 500 companies produced chlor-alkali (a general term to cover the coproduction of chlorine and caustic soda) at more than 650 sites worldwide, with a total annual capacity of more than 51 million metric tons of chlorine. About half of all plants are located in Asia, but many of these are relatively...
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 1 Effect of alkali-oxide concentration on the density of alkali-germanate glasses. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 5 Effect of alkali-oxide concentration on the refractive index of alkali-germanate glasses More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 21 Positive SIMS depth profiles for alkali-lead-silicate crystal glass. (a) Hazed surface. (b) Cleaned surface. Obtained using 18 O − primary beam bombardment in an ion microscope More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 5 Ion-exchange chromatogram of radioactive alkali metals. The apparatus used included a polymeric cation exchange column and radiometric detection. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 5 Isocratic separation of the ammonium ion, alkali metal cations, and alkaline earth cations with the IonPac (Thermo Fisher Scientific) CS12A column. Column dimensions: 4 mm ID by 250 mm; eluent: 18 mM methanesulfonic acid; flow rate: 1 mL/min; injection volume: 25 μL; temperature: 24 °C More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 2 Effect of alkali-oxide concentration on the glass transition temperature of alkali-borate glasses. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 4 Effect of intermediate/alkali ratio on the electrical resistivity of lithium-aluminosilicate and lithium-galliosilicate glasses; T = 100 °C (212 °F). Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 3 Fracture mechanism maps for fcc, bcc, and hcp metals, alkali halides, refractory oxides, and covalently bound materials. Note that fcc metals do not exhibit brittle modes of failure, bcc and hcp metals exhibit a limited range of ductile behavior, and alkali halides, refractory oxides More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 24 Positive secondary ion mass spectroscopy depth profiles for alkali-lead-silicate crystal glass. (a) Hazed surface. (b) Cleaned surface. Acquired using 18 O − primary beam bombardment in an ion microscope More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 5 Delamination of painted steel substrates treated with four different alkali phosphatations after 504 h exposure in salt spray fog. Coating, electrophoretic paint + filler + top-coat. Artificial damage, Van Laar scratch More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 4 Typical indicators of alkali-silica reactivity are map cracking and, in advanced cases, closed joints and attendant spalled concrete. More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 3 Effect of alkali metal salt concentration on corrosion of steel at 35 °C (95 °F) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006049
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... used, namely, inorganic and organic zinc-rich coatings. Common inorganic binders such as post-cured water-based alkali metal silicates, self-cured water-based alkali metal silicates, and self-cured solvent-based alkyl silicates, are reviewed. The article also compares inorganic and organic zinc-rich...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003693
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... by the Society for Protective Coatings are also discussed. These include postcured water-based alkali metal silicates, self-cured water-based alkali metal silicates, and self-cured solvent-based alkyl silicates. The article concludes with information on comparisons of inorganic with organic zinc-rich coatings...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003147
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... of nickel with the inclusion of varying alloying elements. It provides useful information on the behavior of nickel and nickel alloys in specific environments describes its corrosion resistance in certain acids, alkalis, and salts. cast corrosion-resistant alloys corrosion resistance extraction...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003826
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... of hafnium in specific media, namely, water, steam, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, alkalis, organics, molten metals, and gases. Forms of corrosion, namely, galvanic corrosion, crevice corrosion, and pitting corrosion are included. The article explains the corrosion of hafnium alloys...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003821
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
.... The corrosive media include: hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, phosphoric acid, hydrofluoric acid, hydrobromic acid, nitric acid, organic acids, salts, seawater, and alkalis. The modes of high-temperature corrosion include oxidation, carburization, metal dusting, sulfidation, nitridation, corrosion by halogens...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003816
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... describes the corrosion behavior of copper alloys in specific environments. It reviews the corrosion characteristics of copper and copper alloys in various acids, alkalis, salts, organic compounds, and gases. The article provides information on the behavior of copper alloys that is susceptible to stress...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004172
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... focuses on the key factors contributing to corrosion of electronic components, namely, chemicals (salts containing halides, sulfides, acids, and alkalis), temperature, air (polluted air), moisture, contact between dissimilar metals in a wet condition, applied potential differences, and stress...