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4340

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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 10 Delayed-failure characteristics of unnotched specimens of SAE 4340 steel during cathodic charging with hydrogen under standardized conditions. Electrolyte: 4% H 2 SO 4 in water. Poison: 5 drops/liter of cathodic poison composed of 2 g phosphorus dissolved in 40 mL CS 2 . Current More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 12 Mud cracks on the fracture surface of a quenched and tempered 4340 steel exposed to a marine environment. TEM replica More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 24 Fracture surfaces of notched round specimens (4340 steel) from tensile overload at −40 °C (−40 °F). (a) Specimen with a mild notch with a root radius of 2.5 mm (0.1 in.) produced a fracture similar to an unnotched bar (i.e., central fibrous zone with shear lips). Tensile strength More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 50 Fractographic analysis of failed Charpy specimens of 4340 steel tempered to various strength levels. The upper curve represents room-temperature specimens; the lower curve represents specimens broken at −196 °C (−320 °F). All percentages are estimated. Source: Ref 69 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 77 End view of a fractured tensile bar of 4340 steel with specimen axis perpendicular to the rolling direction. A, aligned fibrous region in the center; B, slant fracture surface. 9×. Source: Ref 74 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 16 Beach marks on a 4340 steel part caused by SCC. Tensile strength of the steel was approximately 1780 to 1900 MPa (260 to 280 ksi). The beach marks are a result of differences in the rate of penetration of corrosion on the surface. They are in no way related to fatigue marks. 4× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 32 4340 steel rotor shaft that failed by torsional fatigue. (a) Shear groove designed to protect gear mechanism from sudden overload. Dimensions are in inches. (b) Star-shaped pattern on a fracture surface of the shaft. (c) Longitudinal and transverse shear cracks on the surface More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 17 Surface characteristics of 4340 steel (quenched and tempered, 30 HRC) produced by ECM. (a) Gentle conditions produce slight surface pitting but no other visible changes. (b) Abusive conditions produce surface roughening but no other visible effect on microstructure. (c) Gentle More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 18 Surface characteristics of 4340 steel (annealed, 31 to 36 HRC) produced by CM. (a) Gentle conditions produce no visible surface effects and a surface finish of 0.9 μm (35 μin.). (b) Abusive conditions produce a slight roughening and a surface finish of 3 μm (120 μin.). (c) Gentle More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 20 Residual stress from surface milling 4340 steel (quenched and tempered to 52 HRC). Tool 100 mm (4 in.) diam single-tooth face mill with Carboloy 370 (C-6) carbide End cutting edge angle 5° Peripheral clearance 8° Cutting speed, m/min (ft/min) 55 (180) Feed, mm More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 22 Change in deflection versus tool wearland for the face milling of 4340 steel (quenched and tempered to 52 HRC) Tool 100 mm (4 in.) diam single-tooth face mill with Carboloy 370 (C-6) carbide End cutting edge angle 5° Peripheral clearance 8° Cutting speed, m/min (ft More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 24 Loss of fatigue strength from the abusive grinding of 4340 steel (quenched and tempered to 50 HRC). Fatigue tests involved cantilever bending at room temperature and zero mean stress. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 27 Effect of shot peening on the stress-corrosion resistance of AISI 4340 steel (50 HRC). Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 4 Effect of cutting speed on chip formation of AISI 4340 steel. (a) Cutting speed of 120 m/min (400 sfm). (b) Cutting speed of 975 m/min (3200 sfm). Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 8 Variation of cutting force with speed for AISI 4340 steel. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 9 Variation of chip/tool interface temperature with speed for AISI 4340 steel. Adapted from Ref 36 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 26 Series of fractographs of Charpy V-notch specimens of 4340 steel tested at different temperatures, showing the change in appearance and estimated percentages of fibrous fracture. Source: Army Materials and Mechanics Research Center, Watertown Arsenal More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 15 Incubation time prior to hydrogen stress cracking for AISI type 4340 and type D-6AC steel contoured double-cantilever beam test specimens as a function of decrease in stress intensity More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 26 The CCT diagram for type 4340 steel austenitized at 845 °C (1550 °F). Source: Ref 23 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 37 Effect of tempering temperature on the mechanical properties of type 4340 steel. Source: Ref 2 More