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4140

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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 61 Intergranular fracture surface of an AISI 4140 low-alloy steel nut that failed because of embrittlement by liquid cadmium More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 99 Microstructures of AISI 4140 steel with 0.004% P (left column), 0.013% P (center column), and 0.022% P (right column). Specimens were etched with the etheral-picral etchant described in Ref 442 (top row) and Ref 444 (middle row) and with saturated aqueous picric acid plus a wetting More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 336 Fracture surface of a broken AISI 4140 steel load cell. The radial marks indicate that two crack origins formed at the bottom surface of the cell, apparently near the toe of a weld. Note the continuous shear lip around the top edge. See also Fig. 337 and 338 . Actual size More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 339 Fracture surface of an AISI 4140 steel specimen that was heat treated to high strength and broken in fatigue. Deep secondary cracks are present. Features that appear to be fatigue striations (such as at arrows) may actually be fissures. SEM, 720× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 340 Surface of a fatigue fracture in a stud of AISI 4140 steel with hardness of 34 HRC in the core and 45 HRC at the surface. The crack originated at the bottom in this view, in a well-rubbed fatigue zone, and penetrated nearly 90% of the cross section of the stud before final fast More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 341 Surface of a fatigue fracture in a suspension component of AISI 4140 steel heat treated to a hardness of 273 HB. Two fatigue zones are evident, at lower left and at upper right; the remainder of the fracture surface is the zone of final fast fracture. 5× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 342 Fatigue fracture in an AISI 4140 steel tail-rotor drive-pinion shaft of a helicopter, heat treated to a hardness of 35 HRC. See also Fig. 343 , 344 , 345 , and 346 . Actual size More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 348 Outboard-motor crankshaft, forged of AISI 4140 steel and heat treated to a hardness of 35 to 40 HRC, that fractured in service through a throw (at top). Chromium plating had been used to build up worn journals. See also Fig. 349 , 350 , 351 , 352 , and 353 . ∼0.25× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 354 Ductile fracture of quenched and tempered AISI 4140 showing elongated dimples on fracture surface. Dimple shape is related to mode of fracture—in this case, either shearing or tearing. Matching replicas from adjacent surfaces are needed to distinguish between the two. TEM replica More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 355 Slip band cracks on quenched and tempered AISI 4140. The cracks form most often in more ductile metals during fatigue crack growth on multiple slip planes. Their formation is due to the restraint imposed on reverse slip by large carbides or other second-phase particles in conjunction More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 356 Tire tracks on fatigue fracture surface of AISI 4140 quenched and tempered at 700 °C (1290 °F). This feature is unique to fatigue fractures and is frequently observed in cases where crack propagation rate was high and few or no striations formed (as in low-cycle fatigue More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 7 Flow lines in a forged 4140 steel hook. Specimen was etched using 50% HCl. 0.5× More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3 Results of liquid pressure nitriding on SAE 4140 low-alloy steel (composition, 0.38C-0.89Mn-1.03Cr-0.18Mo; core hardness, 35 HRC) More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 13 Comparison of case depth vs. process time for ion and gas nitriding of 4140 steel. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 20 Compound layer on the ion-nitrided surface of quenched and tempered 4140 steel. The compound layer is supported by a diffused case, which is not observable in this micrograph. Nital etched. Original magnification: 500× More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 12 Hardness and notch toughness of 4140 steel tempered for 1 h at various temperatures More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 16 (a) Planetary ring gear microstructure at tooth root with SAE 4140 steel. Original magnification: 50×. (b) Microstructure at tooth root with SAE 4140 steel. Original magnification: 200× More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 29 To encourage metal flow in the 0.09-in. legs of this 4140 steel investment casting, ribs were added as shown. These were removed before shipment. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 30 To encourage metal flow in the thin sections of this 4140 steel investment casting, the legs were tapered as shown. Compare with similar casting shown in Fig. 29 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 10 Time-temperature austenitizing diagram for 42CrMo4 (SAE 4140) steel. Source: Ref 13 More