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316L stainless steel

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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 77 Microstructure and fracture appearance of type 316L stainless steel tested in creep to fracture in air at 800 °C (1470 °F), using a 53-MPa (7.7-ksi) load. Time to rupture: 839 h. The light micrograph (a) illustrates w-crack coalescence by slow shearing along grain boundaries. The SEM More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 17 Anodic potentiodynamic polarization curves for 316L stainless steel. A, P/M specimen; B, wrought specimen. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 33 Microstructures of type 316L stainless steel sintered in hydrogen at 1150 °C (2100 °F). (a) Low carbon content. (b) Excessive carbon content. Both 400× (original magnification) More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 42 Microstructure of type 316L stainless steel sintered in a high-dew-point atmosphere. Oxygen content: 5100 ppm; sintered density: 7.5 g/cm 3 . Etched with Marble's reagent. Original magnification: 200× More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 51 Anodic potentiodynamic polarization curves for 316L stainless steel in 0.1 N NaCl/0.4 N NaClO 4 as a function of surface finishing. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 18 Pitting of type 316L stainless steel in flue gas desulfurization scrubber environments. Solid lines indicate zones of differing severity of corrosion; because the zones are not clearly defined, the lines cannot be precisely drawn. Source: Ref 52 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 5 Auger electron spectroscopy depth profile of a type 316L stainless steel surface. The exposed metal surface is on the left, and the composition with depth from the surface changes as one moves to the right. The base metal composition is reached at approximately 12.5 nm, or 35 atoms More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 2 Effect of acid concentration on corrosion rate of type 316L stainless steel in phosphoric acid at 163 °C (325 °F) More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 45 Resultant leak of 316L stainless steel due to internal SRB activity More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 3 SEM micrographs showing corrosion attack of a 316L stainless steel modular junction (both surfaces are the same alloy) from a retrieved intramedullary rod (e.g., see Fig. 1c ) and from a retrieved SROM modular total hip replacement where the body of the femoral component has a major More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 3 Typical microstructure of 316L stainless steel. (a) Annealed. (b) Cold worked More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 11 S - N curves for 316L stainless steel showing premature corrosion fatigue failure when immersed in Ringer's solution compared to deionized/distilled water (37 °C, or 98.6 °F) More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 2 Microstructures of type 316L stainless steel sintered at 1149 °C (2100 °F) (Glyceregia). (a) C is 0.015%, clean and thin grain boundaries. (b) C is 0.07%, necklace type chromium-rich carbide precipitates in grain boundaries. (c) C is 0.11%, continuous chromium-rich carbide precipitates More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 3 Water-atomized 316L stainless steel powder particles with a size range of 300 to 600 micrometers that are compacted and sintered to 45% density in order to yield a 40 micron filter grade. 100× More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 4 Water-atomized 316L stainless steel powder particles with a size range of 45 micrometers and less that are compacted and sintered to 75% density in order to yield a 0.5 micron filter grade. 100× More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 14 Metal injection molding 316L stainless steel pump body and cavity plates. Tooling options enabled the design to maximize the flow area, minimize outlet and inlet flow velocities, and reduce overall pump dimensions. Courtesy of MPIF More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7 Microstructure of a cold-sprayed type 316L stainless steel coating on an aluminum substrate using nitrogen as the process gas. (a) As-polished. (b) Etched. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 16 Pitting of type 316L stainless steel in flue gas desulfurization scrubber environment. Solid lines indicate zones of differing severity of corrosion; because the zones are not clearly defined, the lines cannot be precisely drawn. Source: Ref 39 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 Pitting corrosion of 316L stainless steel pipe. (a) View of pitting on the outside-diameter surface at the leak location. (b) View of the inside-diameter surface, where the pit size was larger at the leak location. There was a rusty discoloration along the bottom of the pipe. (c) Cross More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4 Slip-corrected viscosity of 316L stainless steel feedstock using three different capillary diameters. Source: Ref 14 More