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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 17 Conventional SADP (a) and ZOLZ-CBEDP (b) in 316 stainless steel. The diffraction patterns were taken along the [111] zone axis. The two diffraction patterns are essentially identical and can be indexed using the same procedure. If the beam convergence angle in the CBEDP is increased More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 19 Kossel CBEDP from 316 stainless steel in which the diffraction disks overlap. Only the zero-order Laue reflections are visible in this image. Courtesy of M. Kersker More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 20 HOLZ pattern taken from 316 stainless steel. Only the FOLZ ring is present in the CBEDP. The HOLZ lines are also visible. Analysis of these patterns allows for precise determination of the three-dimensional crystallography of the specimen. Courtesy of M. Kersker More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 93 Reflectance of rhodium as a function of wavelength. Sources: Ref 316 , 317 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 1 316 stainless steel. (a) As-compacted powder particles. (b) Sintered at 1066 °C (1950 °F) for 30 min. (c) Sintered at 1121 °C (2050 °F) for 30 min. (d) Sintered at 1316 °C (2400 °F) for 2 h. ∼650× More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 3 Corrosion weight loss for 316 stainless steel as a function of sintering atmosphere for three sintering temperatures. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 1 Examples of water-atomized stainless steel powder. (a) 409L. (b) 316 of high apparent density (slightly more rounded edges). Both scanning electron microscope images, original magnification: 100× More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 2 Braze joint between two low-density (6.6 g/cm 3 ) PM 316 stainless steel components. Villella's etch. Source: SSI Technologies, Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 1 Cavities (indicated as the white rectangles and circles) formed in type 316 stainless steel irradiated to 60 dpa at 600 °C (1110 °F) in the HFIR. Courtesy of P.J. Maziasz, Oak Ridge National Laboratory More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 7 Effect of tensile hold time on fatigue endurance of type 316 stainless steel. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 32 Room-temperature impact toughness of 316 stainless steel after aging at indicated temperatures. Source: Ref 23 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 33 Design fatigue-strain range curves for 340 and 316 stainless steel. (a) Design curves with continuous cycling (pure fatigue). (b) Design curves with hold times (creep-fatigue interaction) More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 3 X-ray diffraction patterns of untreated and plasma-nitrided (PN) AISI 316 steel showing two broad peaks, S1 and S2, generated from low-temperature nitrided layer. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 9 Layer thickness vs. plasma nitriding temperature for AISI 316, 304, and 321 stainless steels. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 14 Micrograph of nitrided AISI 316 (673 K for 4 h) showing the S-phase layer above the austenitic matrix. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 15 Micrograph of nitrocarburized AISI 316 (673 K for 4 h) showing the S-phase layer above the austenitic matrix. Source: Ref 14 More
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