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19-mm Hopkinson bar

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003301
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... and the dynamic triaxial load cell on a 19-mm Hopkinson bar. lateral compression pneumatic pressure vessel 75-mm Hopkinson system concrete rock polymeric composites coarse microstructure dynamic triaxial load cell 19-mm Hopkinson bar triaxial Hopkinson techniques axial compression COMPRESSIVE...
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 6 Schematic of a 19 mm ( 3 4 in.) Hopkinson bar featuring the dynamic triaxial load cell More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 5 Close-up photograph of dynamic triaxial load cell on a 19 mm ( 3 4 in.) Hopkinson bar More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003296
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... behavior of a material, alternate Hopkinson bar schemes were designed for loading samples in uniaxial tension ( Ref 14 , 19 , 20 ), torsion ( Ref 21 ), simultaneous torsion compression ( Ref 22 ), and simultaneous compression torsion ( Ref 23 ). High-strain-rate testing in a Hopkinson bar under...
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 7 Response of mortar tested under uniaxial and triaxial compression at about 500 s −1 on a 19 mm ( 3 4 in.) Hopkinson bar More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003298
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... ( Ref 3 , 17 , 18 , 19 ). Table 1 summarizes the elastic modulus and impedance values for a range of typical pressure-bar materials. Comparison of the impedance properties of bar materials for split-Hopkinson pressure bar testing Table 1 Comparison of the impedance properties of bar...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003297
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... a good impedance match between the inserts and the bars in such constructions. Fig. 18 Typical (a) stress and (b) strain pulses obtained by pulse shaping to produce constant strain rate in an elastic sample. Source: Ref 12 Fig. 19 Modified split-Hopkinson compression bar to test hard...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003299
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... Abstract Split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing is traditionally used for determining the plastic properties of metals (which are softer than the pressure bar material) at high strain rates. However, the use of this method for testing ceramic has various limitations. This article provides...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003302
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... hoc, or temporary, solution to create a single dynamic indentation, none of the methods offer the elegance and simplicity of the recovery bar momentum-trapping device developed for SHPB (see Ref 19 and the article “Recovery Hopkinson Bar Testing” in this Volume). With proper instrumentation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003294
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... Abstract This article reviews high strain rate compression and tension test methods with a focus on the general principles, advantages, and limitations of each test method. The compression test methods are cam plastometer test, drop tower compression test, the Hopkinson bar in compression...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003300
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... is a variation of a technique proposed by Kolsky ( Ref 2 ), in which the specimen is loaded in compression. It is described in the article “Classic Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar Testing” in this Volume. Fig. 1 Dynamic aspects of material testing. Source Ref 1 Fig. 2 Schematic of the torsional...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003295
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... Setup and Operation The test setup ( Fig. 7a ) ( Ref 19 , 30 ) is a specimen placed between the input and output bars. To reduce ringing effects during the shear test, a small lead or copper disc of 3 to 5 mm (0.12 to 0.20 in.) in diameter and 0.25 to 0.5 mm (0.01 to 0.02 in.) thickness is placed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003315
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
.... In specimens of materials with high damping and large cross sections, this heat rise can be extreme. Figure 10(a) shows the temperature contour of a 12 mm (0.48 in.) diam resonant steel bar without cooling ( Ref 32 ). The strain antinode heated to almost 400 °C (750 °F) during ultrasonic-frequency cycling...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003330
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... ). The upper block of the fixture is bolted to the crosshead of the testing machine. The lower block rests on the base of the test machine. The wedge grips have flat surfaces that rest in the end block cavities. Large diameter (19 mm, or 0.75 in.) rods and linear bearings are used to maintain alignment during...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003308
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... 25 20 16 11 6 8.0 90 85 80 75 70 65 60 55 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Fig. 9 Sketch of a fractured impact test bar. The method used in calculating percent shear involves measuring average dimensions A and B to the nearest 0.5 mm (0.02 in.) and then consulting...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005508
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
... Abstract This article describes the most commonly used test methods for determining flow stress in metal-forming processes. The methods include tension, ring, uniform compression, plane-strain compression, torsion, split-Hopkinson bar, and indentation tests. The article discusses the effect...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006384
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... tests such as split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests. Split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests allow an estimation of the strain rate sensitivity ( Ref 67 ) that can be included in FEM simulations using a model such as the Johnson-Cook plasticity model in which a logarithmic dependency of flow stress...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 24A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 June 2023
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v24A.a0006952
EISBN: 978-1-62708-439-0
... of a spherical indentation. (b) Example indentation stress-strain curve. Source: Ref 19 Employing an additive manufacturing technique known as laser-engineered net shaping ( Ref 18 ), researchers ( Ref 19 ) deposited compositionally graded titanium-nickel cylindrical specimens ~10 mm (0.4...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003276
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... and Hopkinson pressure bar methods) Abrasion tests Erosion tests The more common types of hardness tests are the indentation methods, described in previous articles in this Section. These tests use a variety of indentation loads ranging from 1 gf (microindentation) to 3000 kgf (Brinell). Low...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009010
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... Rate Testing” in Mechanical Testing and Evaluation , Volume 8 of the ASM Handbook , 2000, p 427). For strain rates from 100 to 1000 s −1 , the Hopkinson (Kolsky)-bar method is used. This article and the following discussions only consider isothermal conditions and strain rates below 0.1 s −1 , where...