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Abstract

This chapter describes the characteristic damage of a mid-air explosion and how it appears in metal debris recovered from crash sites of downed aircraft. It explains that explosive forces produce telltale signs such as petaling, curling, spalling, spikes, reverse slant fractures, and metal deposits. Explosive forces can also cause ductile metals such as aluminum to disintegrate into tiny pieces and are associated with chemicals that leave residues along with numerous craters on metal surfaces. The chapter provides examples of the different types of damage as revealed in the investigation of two in-flight bombings.

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Explosive Sabotage, Failure Analysis of Engineering Structures: Methodology and Case Histories, By V. Ramachandran, A.C. Raghuram, R.V. Krishnan, S.K. Bhaumik, ASM International, 2005, p 45–51, https://doi.org/10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270045

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