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thermosetting resins

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006924
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... Abstract This article discusses the most common thermal analysis methods for thermosetting resins. These include differential scanning calorimetry, thermomechanical analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and dynamic mechanical analysis. The article also discusses the characterization of uncured...
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 3 Light micrographs of specimens of 1215 carbon steel that were salt bath nitrided and mounted in different resins. (a) Thermosetting epoxy resin. (b) Phenolic thermosetting resin. (c) Methyl methacrylate thermoplastic resin. (d) Electroless nickel plated and mounted in thermosetting More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 11 Light micrographs of specimens of 1215 carbon steel that were salt bath nitrided and mounted in different resins. (a) Epomet thermosetting epoxy resin. (b) Phenolic thermosetting resin. (c) Methyl methacrylate thermoplastic resin. (d) Electroless nickel plated and mounted Epomet More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 4 Light micrograph of an ion-nitrided H13 tool steel specimen mounted in epoxy thermosetting resin. The arrows point to a white-etching iron nitride layer at the surface that probably would not have been observed if the specimen was nickel plated for edge protection. Specimen etched More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 12 Light micrograph of an ion-nitrided H13 tool steel specimen mounted in epoxy thermosetting resin (Epomet). The arrows point to a white-etching iron nitride layer at the surface that probably would not have been observed if the specimen was nickel plated for edge protection. Specimen More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006916
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... that the strength of a test specimen can be reduced by up to ninety percent ( Ref 13 ). Thermoset and Composite Manufacturing Related Failures Thermosetting resins are an important and unique type of engineering material. Thermoplastic polymers are long-chain molecules that have been polymerized to high...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006923
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... 31 Styrene-maleic anhydride (S/MA) terpolymer 103 215 80 175 … … … Thermoset resins (neat) Heat-deflection temperature at 1.82 MPa (0.264 ksi) Continuous service temperature Thermal conductivity Coefficient of thermal expansion, 10 −6 /°C °C °F °C °F W/m · K...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003532
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... uses a device, called a mounting press, to provide the required pressure and heat to encapsulate the specimen with a thermosetting or thermoplastic mounting material. Common thermosetting resins include phenolic, diallyl phthalate, and epoxy, while methyl methacrylate is the most commonly used...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006935
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... resistance. In thermosetting resins, which are cross linked in their final form, the molecule is infinitely large. During processing, however, its size can be as small as that of the monomer. Some of the liquid resins used to produce thermosets can have very low viscosities and can be ideal...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006765
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... sources of injurious effects. The most common mounting method uses a device, called a mounting press, to provide the required pressure and heat to encapsulate the specimen with a thermosetting or thermoplastic mounting material. Common thermosetting resins include phenolic, diallyl phthalate...
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 16 Thermoset conversion from liquid resin to rigid polymer during curing process. Adapted from Ref 14 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006925
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... thermoplastics are presented for comparison. Finally, the properties and applications of six common thermosets are briefly considered. chemical properties chemical structure electrical properties mechanical properties optical properties thermal properties thermoplastics thermosets...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006849
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
.... The attendant distortion, warpage, and dimensional instabilities are directly related to the degree of “cruelty” suffered in processing. The consequences of processing at all stages must be addressed when discussing the thermomechanical properties of both thermoplastic and thermosetting resin systems...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006864
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... Applications and Typical Products In the simplest terms, all plastics processing techniques involve three key steps: fluidizing (plasticating), shaping, and solidification. Raw materials are typically sourced as pellets or powders (thermoplastic) or as monomeric liquid and cross-linking agent (thermoset...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.9781627083959
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 27 The Fourier transform infrared spectrum obtained on a properly cured steel plate exhibited bands characteristic of a thermoset acrylic resin. The results were noticeably different than the results from the plate associated with a failed part. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006929
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... of Moisture on the Mechanical Properties of Thermoset Resins In this section are discussions of moisture effects on mechanical properties focus on epoxy and polyester. Epoxy Resins Absorbed water results in a depression of the T g in polymeric materials and a loss in other performance...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003571
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... thermosets such as phenolic and epoxy resins have been used and studied extensively. These polymers do not soften when the temperature rises at the interface, and thus they prevent the component from yielding or failing in a catastrophic manner during service. However, thermal energy dissipated due...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006850
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... to sliding. Brake pads are one application where thermosets such as phenolic and epoxy resins have been used and studied extensively. These polymers do not soften when the temperature rises at the interface, and thus they prevent the component from yielding or failing in a catastrophic manner during service...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006922
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
.... This article reviews the numerous considerations that are equally important to help ensure that part failure does not occur. It provides a quick review of thermoplastic and thermoset plastics. The article focuses primarily on thermoset materials that at room temperature are below their glass transition...