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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c0090994
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
... Abstract Two large tension springs fractured during installation. The springs were manufactured from a grade 9254 chromium-silicon steel spring wire. The associated material specification allows wire in the cold-drawn or oil-tempered (quenched-and-tempered) condition. The specified wire tensile...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001111
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... the bridge was designed, the plans specified ASTM A517 grade F steel in the tension flanges of the trapezoidal box girders. When the contract was let, the steel producer convinced all parties that A517 grade H would be a satisfactory substitute, even though grade H has a leaner chemistry and is limited...
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 10 SEM micrograph shows LF14 tension-to-tension fatigue crack initiation (FCI) site at planar grain boundary facet (Center). 150× More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Failure of tension springs. (a) Spring fracture surface showing the presence of a discolored precrack region. 3×. (b) Cross section through the precracked region of the spring revealing a thick scale (vertical surface) on the fracture surface. 2% nital etch. 148× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Various features of a typical stress-strain curve obtained from a tension test More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 End of a steel wire rope that failed in tension because of overloading. Necking at the ends of the wires indicates ductile fracture; no worn or abraded areas were found at the break. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Radiograph showing a tension band fixation containing a cerclage wire, two screws, and washers beneath the screw heads. See also Fig. 10 . More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 16 Crack arrest lines on edge-notched tension specimens. Material thickness 13 mm ( 1 2 in.), 10 mm ( 3 8 in.), and 6 mm ( 1 4 in.). Note the distance for first arrest, which increases with section thickness, and note that the arrest lines are not closed More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Craze formation in a polycarbonate polymer in tension under alcohol. Source: Ref 37 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 17 Microvoid coalescence in an aluminum-silicon alloy (A380) loaded in tension. (a) Fracture surfaces consist of cleaved particles (i.e., silicon) and ridged fracture of the aluminum. 200×. (b) Higher-magnification (1440×) view of boxed region. (c) A fractured aluminum ligament surrounded More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 28 Schematic of fracture surface regions in cylindrical tension-test specimens. (a) Surface from cone portion of fractured unnotched tensile specimen. (b) Surface of fractured notched specimen. Unlike the fracture surface for an unnotched specimen, the fracture surface for the notched More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 40 Typical fracture appearances for unnotched prismatic tension-test sections More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 41 Typical fracture appearances for edge- and side-notched rectangular tension-test sections. Note the shear lips when the fracture approaches the edge of the specimen. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 58 As-cast gray cast iron loaded in tension. It is common to find little or no macroscale information visible on the fracture surface of many casting alloys to indicate the fracture origin and direction of crack propagation. There are exceptions to this, including the nodular irons More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 59 Tension and compression side of a gray iron loaded in bending. The fracture surface is devoid of any markings to indicate the fracture origin or direction of crack propagation. However, examination of the edge of the component at the fracture surface indicates that the tension side More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 62 Fracture surface of as-cast Inconel 713C tension-test section showing evidence of dendritic solidification. No fracture initiation location is evident. Tensile strength, 1048 MPa (152 ksi); yield strength, 827 MPa (120 ksi); total elongation, 6%; hardness, 36 HRC. Source: Ref 74 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 31 Fracture surface of notched tension test of alloy steel tested at 0 °C (32 °F). Fibrous overload fracture surface exhibits fine circumferential ridges. Similar markings have been erroneously identified as fatigue beach marks. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Silicon nitride rod broken in uniaxial tension. Fracture origin is at the top of the image. Optical microscope; reflected light (direct illumination); picture width ∼5 mm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Silicon nitride rod broken in uniaxial tension. The same rod shown in Fig. 5 . Fracture origin is at the top of the image. Optical microscope; reflected light (oblique illumination); picture width ∼5 mm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Silicon nitride rod broken in uniaxial tension. Fracture origin is just to the left of the center of the rod. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼5 mm More