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stress rupture

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001814
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... Incoloy 825 96.0 49.0 45 Stress rupture time estimates Table 6 Stress rupture time estimates Condition Temp (°F) Internal stress Wall stress Predicted failure time (h) Possible exposure time (h) MPa psig MPa ksi Condition 1 1,200 6.2 900 88 12.78 60 4.5...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003545
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract This article reviews the applied aspects of creep and stress-rupture failures. It discusses the microstructural changes and bulk mechanical behavior of classical and nonclassical creep behavior. The article provides a description of microstructural changes and damage from creep...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001758
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... Fig. 1 Data showing improvements in stress-rupture life for the equiaxed (EQ), directionally solidified (DS), and single crystal (SX) type castings Fig. 2 Macroetched turbine blades showing characteristic grain structure for equiaxed (EQ), directionally solidified (DS), and single...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006780
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract The principal types of elevated-temperature mechanical failure are creep and stress rupture, stress relaxation, low- and high-cycle fatigue, thermal fatigue, tension overload, and combinations of these, as modified by environment. This article briefly reviews the applied aspects...
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 9 Comparison of stress-rupture properties for service exposed header base material, creep-damaged longitudinal seam-weld metal, and virgin steel tubes at 650 C. More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 1 Data showing improvements in stress-rupture life for the equiaxed (EQ), directionally solidified (DS), and single crystal (SX) type castings More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 4 Schematic showing general stress-rupture curve shape for three different temperatures. Note rupture life decreases with increasing temperature for a given stress and potential for slope changes due to microstructural instabilities associated with higher temperatures and times More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 5 Examples of turbine blade release due to stress-rupture resulting in moderate damage (left) and extensive damage (“corn-cobbed”) to the HP rotor (right). Damage on the right normally results in engine shutdown More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 7 Entirely interdendritic stress-rupture fracture observed on the trailing edge of a solid equiaxed turbine blade casting. Note irregular nature of crack front in middle of fracture commonly observed on fractures possessing a creep component during propagation More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 8 Stress-rupture initiated fracture on trailing edge of internally cooled SX turbine blade casting adjacent to the platform. Fracture mode transitioned from stress rupture to fatigue until airfoil separation occurred via engine-induced tensile overload More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 9 Initial region of rougher, interdendritic stress-rupture fracture at the trailing edge SX turbine blade casting. Creep voids can be observed on the fracture surface in this case More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 11 Internally cooled turbine blade casting exhibiting TE stress-rupture crack caused by interruption of cooling air due to unintentional introduction of shot-peen media during initial blade manufacturing More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 27 Stress rupture curve for 1¼ Cr–½ Mo steel More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 10 Low-magnification micrograph showing stress-rupture tears in weld bead and underlying heat-affected zone More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 11 Microstructure of heat-affected zone with stress-rupture tears developing along transverse grain boundaries More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 13 Normal strain rate ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and stress-rupture strengths at various temperatures (as percentage of normal strain rate UTS at room temperature). (Data from Ref 1 and 14) More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 14 Stress-rupture strengths of A612 steel at various temperatures (as percentages of normal strain rate ultimate tensile strength, or UTS, at temperature). (Based on data from Ref 1) More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 33 Stress-rupture curves for virgin material and predamaged material showing the various life fractions. Virgin material rupture life at 575 °C (1065 °F) is 62,210 h Estimated remaining life at 575 °C (1065 °F) for predamaged samples based on: Symbol Damage fraction Life More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 35 Cross-weld stress-rupture data for 2 1 4 Cr-1Mo ex-service pipe seam weldments corrected for service exposure More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 14 Replication and microstructural evaluation combined with stress-rupture testing as performed on turbine blades and heater tubes to estimate their remaining life. (a) Land-based turbine. (b) Heater tubes. (c) Typical stress-rupture curve for 9Cr-1Mo material showing that the stress More