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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.bldgs.c9001653
EISBN: 978-1-62708-219-8
..., the color near the key changed from yellow to red-brown. The gate was made from leaded red brass (85-5-5-5) while the spindle was made from silicon brass. It was concluded that the valves failed by dezincification resulting from bimetallic galvanic corrosion. It is common in the valve industry to use...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001772
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... Abstract A cast silicon bronze (UNS C86700) impeller that had been severely corroded was submitted for failure analysis. The failed part was used to pump potable water, but service life and chlorine content of the water were unknown. The impeller displayed a Cu-rich red phase on its surfaces...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 25 Porosity in GMAW core-plated silicon steel laminations. 100× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Both halves of a silicon nitride bar broken in bending. The tensile surfaces are in contact with each other. The fracture origin appears to be a hole (pore) in the bottom piece, but the origin is really an inclusion, as seen on the top piece. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Silicon nitride rod broken in uniaxial tension. Fracture origin is at the top of the image. Optical microscope; reflected light (direct illumination); picture width ∼5 mm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Silicon nitride rod broken in uniaxial tension. The same rod shown in Fig. 5 . Fracture origin is at the top of the image. Optical microscope; reflected light (oblique illumination); picture width ∼5 mm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Silicon nitride rod broken in uniaxial tension. Fracture origin is just to the left of the center of the rod. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼5 mm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 16 Silicon nitride rod broken in bending. Fracture origin is at the top of the image. The horizontal line near the bottom of the image is the cantilever curl, typical of bending failure as the fracture approaches the compression side. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼5 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 26 Fracture surface of silicon nitride with machining flaw as origin. Specimen was tilted in the SEM showing the machined surface at the top and the fracture surface at the bottom. Machining flaw is aligned with grooves on the original surface. SEM; picture width ∼1 mm. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Examples of strength-limiting defects in ceramics. (a) Silicon inclusion in reaction-bonded silicon nitride. (b) Powder agglomerate in sintered silicon carbide. (c) Machining damage in hot pressed silicon nitride. SEM; picture widths (a) ∼150 μm. (b) ∼300 μm, (c) ∼150 μm. Source: Ref More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Silicon bronze contact-finger retainer that failed from SCC in shipboard service. (a) Overall view of retainer showing cracking in corner (arrow). (b) Specimen taken from failure region showing secondary cracks (arrows). Etched with equal parts NH 4 OH and H 2 O 2 . 250× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 16 Average crater area vs. number of impacts for SN220M silicon nitride counterfaces impacted with a SN220M silicon nitride ball at varying humidities. Source: Ref 32 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 17 Crater depth vs. number of impacts for GS-44 silicon nitride counterfaces of varying surface finish impacted with a NBD-200 silicon nitride ball. Source: Ref 33 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ), plasma etched More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 17 Microvoid coalescence in an aluminum-silicon alloy (A380) loaded in tension. (a) Fracture surfaces consist of cleaved particles (i.e., silicon) and ridged fracture of the aluminum. 200×. (b) Higher-magnification (1440×) view of boxed region. (c) A fractured aluminum ligament surrounded More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 52 Torsion fracture in an aluminum-silicon alloy (alloy 319-T5). Classic brittle torsion fracture on a plane at 45° to the axis of the cylinder. Hardness, 38 HRB; tensile strength, 179 MPa (26 ksi); total elongation, 0.5%. Source: Ref 42 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 53 Macroscale brittle torsion fracture in an aluminum-silicon alloy (alloy A356 sand casting). Hardness, 38 HRB; tensile strength, 214 MPa (31 ksi); total elongation, 4%. Source: Ref 42 More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 12 Peaks of an EDAX spectrum showing the presence of silicon, vanadium, lead, and zinc More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 1 a Aluminum–silicon–bronze microstructure (etchant: alcoholic ferric chloride solution), b intergranular defect in aluminum–silicon–bronze microstructure. Vertical direction is longitudinal direction of bar More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 18 Average crater area versus number of impacts for SN220M silicon nitride counterfaces impacted with a SN220M silicon nitride ball at varying humidities. Source: Ref 44 More