1-20 of 276 Search Results for

shear loading

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 18 Fracture planes that are 45° to the direction of loading. (a) Single-shear plane. (b) Double-shear plane More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
on both halves of the fracture surface. Mode II (in-plane shear) loading creates dimples that point in opposite directions on the two halves of the fracture surface. Mode III (out-of-plane shear) loading creates dimples that are rotated with respect to the macroscale direction of crack growth. More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 10 The orientation of the actual weld throat provides evidence of the principal loading direction that caused the failure. (a) Assumed throat of a fillet weld and actual throat for shear loading. (b) Actual failure plane approaches parallel for tensile load. (c) Actual failure plane More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 8 Microhardness indentations (10gf load) in a region of adiabatic shear. A light unresolved substructure is apparent in the shear band. Etched in 2% nital. DIC illumination. More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 46 Shear stresses produced by a cylindrical roller under compressive load below the surface of the bearing raceway. Adapted from Ref 42 More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.bldgs.c0046505
EISBN: 978-1-62708-219-8
... and depth of the corrosion, which had drastically weakened the remaining metal in the contact area. Other areas of the failure surface showed transgranular cracks. Discussion and Conclusions Corrosion of the malleable iron latch was by galvanic action and greatly reduced the shear load the latch...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003538
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... by slip seemed to obey a critical resolved shear stress law (Schmid's law). Single crystals could be made to extensively twin rather easily. Today, Sohnke's law is no longer assumed to be valid (although a normal stress facilitates cleavage), and no critical shear stress law based on external loading has...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006775
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... a critical resolved shear-stress law (Schmid’s law). Single crystals could be made to extensively twin rather easily. Today (2020), Sohnke’s law is no longer assumed to be valid (although a normal stress facilitates cleavage), and no critical shear-stress law based on external loading has been accepted...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001812
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... fasteners are one-piece fasteners, either solid or tubular, that are used in assemblies in which the load is primarily shear. A malleable collar is sometimes swaged or formed on the pin to secure the joint. Special-Purpose Fasteners Special-purpose fasteners, many of which are proprietary...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006767
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... analysis of the component is necessary. Stress analysis is initially performed in the design stage of a development project. Frequently, principal stresses and maximum shear stresses are important to the designer because both are used in common failure expressions to calculate maximum load capability (e.g...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003530
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... project. Frequently, principal stresses and maximum shear stresses are important to the designer because both are used in common failure expressions to calculate maximum load capability (e.g. multiaxial yield criteria). One failure mode theory is the Rankine (or maximum normal stress) criterion, where...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c9001910
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
.... In addition, the unused top and bottom bolt shafts were not nitrided, as confirmed through metallography and microhardness testing. These components also had a silicon content nearly double of that specified. Finally, both of the spiral spring pins failed to achieve the 3,900 lb double shear load. One...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.modes.c0091096
EISBN: 978-1-62708-234-1
... Abstract A 4340 steel shaft, the driving member of a large rotor subject to cyclic loading and frequent overloads, broke after three weeks of operation. The driving shaft contained a shear groove at which the shaft should break if a sudden high overload occurred, thus preventing damage...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006805
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... mechanism, an explosive, or other device forms an upset on the inaccessible side. Pin fasteners are one-piece fasteners, either solid or tubular, that are used in assemblies in which the load is primarily shear. A malleable collar is sometimes swaged or formed on the pin to secure the joint. Special-purpose...
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 4 Distribution of required hardness within the thickness of the material (it follows the maximum shear stress, τ shear , below the surface) under normal compressive load, F compr (most loaded rolling element), where curve 1 is shear stress, τ shear , and curve 2 is material More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 22 Schematic of typical behavior of flush-head rivets. (a) Loading of rivet. A, bearing area of the upper sheet; B , bearing area of the lower sheet; L , load; P , shear component; P t , tension component; P r , resultant of shear and tension components. (b) Shear and tension More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001285
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... of individual wires, thus inducing them to fail in shear. Shear failure required substantially lower service loads. In addition, overtightening of the clip caused physical crushing damage in a majority of the individual wires, thereby further, and again substantially, reducing the load-carrying capacity...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001840
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... to the mentioned standard ( Fig. 4b ). By applying the pressure on top of the sample, the interface undergoes the shear stress which finally dissembles the cladded bimetal. The shear strength is calculated by dividing the maximum pushing load by contact area of cladding plate and substrate. Also, to be more...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c9001438
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... release of the load. Fracture was wholly of the brittle cleavage type except for a small crescent shaped lip at the top right-hand side. In this zone, fracture occurred at an angle of 45 deg to the general plane of fracture, indicative of failure in shear. Failure of the hook had taken place where...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.modes.c9001671
EISBN: 978-1-62708-234-1
... structure and lack of carbides in the band. The adiabatic shear bands are considerably harder than the surrounding tempered martensite structure. Figure 8 shows several 10gf Vickers microhardness indentations on and around a shear band. The tempered martensite hardness was 330 HV (10gf load...