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shank

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Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 32 (a) Parallel lines of corrosion on the shank of a PH13-8Mo stainless steel aircraft attachment bolt. (b) Close-up of fracture surface of bolt showing corroded area. Arrows point to one possible crack arrest line. (c) Scanning electron microscopy fractograph of area B in (b). Note More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Showing position of fracture at junction of shank with hook portion. (×1). More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 (a) Parallel lines of corrosion on the shank of a PH13-8Mo stainless steel aircraft attachment bolt. (b) Close-up of fracture surface of bolt showing corroded area. Arrows point to one possible crack arrest line. (c) Scanning electron microscopy fractograph of area B in (b). Note More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 3 Profile sketch of failed shank shows defect locations. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 4 Inside surface of shank showing main defect site; Arrows indicate fracture. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 5 Inside surface of shank shows other defect sites. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 6 Inside surface of shank showing characteristics of defect site. More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 1 Failed rotor blade showing fracture shank of the blade. Approximately. 0.31×. More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 2 Fracture surfaces in failed tail rotor blade spar shank. Approximately 0.66×. More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 5 Light micrograph of tail rotor blade shank bore surface. Patterns remaining on surface were result of electrolytic attack produced by lead wool adjacent to aluminum spar in presence of an electrolyte. Black material was found to be corrosion/reaction product filling spherical pits More
Image
Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 2 Fracture surfaces of wheel stud shown in Fig. 1 . The shank end of the stud was not removed from then nut. Both surfaces were slightly damaged. (a) Head end. (b) Shank end still in nut. More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 3 Extensive cracking spread over the central shank portion of a nonfractured bolt detected by wet fluorescent magnetic particle inspection. Cracks are oriented circumferentially around the shank in planes of principal stress, resulting from combined torsional and tensile stresses. Regions More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 4 Circumferential cracks found in shank adjacent to threaded section. 1× More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 1 Closeup view of the bolt-shank fracture surface. Note the heavy scale on the zone 1 surface. More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c0046222
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... Abstract The spindle of a helicopter-rotor blade fractured after 7383 h of flight service. At every overhaul (the spindle that failed was overhauled six times and reworked twice), any spindle that showed wear was reworked by grinding the shank to 0.1 mm (0.004 in.) under the finished diam...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c9001507
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... investigation determined that the four-bladed propeller from the left inboard engine had separated in flight, subsequently impacting the left outboard engine, causing its propeller to separate also. Three years later, the left inboard propeller hub was recovered. All four blades had separated through the shank...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.usage.c9001728
EISBN: 978-1-62708-236-5
... Abstract The propeller from a small private airplane came off in flight. The head ends of all six attachment bolts remained in the propeller hub when it was found. Two threaded shanks with nuts remained with the engine, while the remaining four shank ends with their nuts were missing. Parts...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c0048060
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... Abstract The crane hook (rated for 13000 kg) failed in the threaded shank while lifting a load of 9072 kg. The metal in the hook was revealed by chemical analysis to be killed 1020 steel. It was disclosed by visual examination that the fracture had at the last thread on the shank and rough...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c0048630
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... hydrogen embrittlement. The bolts broke at the junction of the head and shank. The nuts were, theoretically, installed fingertight. The failure was attributed to hydrogen embrittlement that had not been satisfactorily alleviated by subsequent baking. The presence of burrs on the threads prevented assembly...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... Abstract Sudden and unexplained bearing cap bolt fractures were experienced with reduced-shank design bolts fabricated from 42 CrMo 4 steel, quenched and tempered to a nominal hardness of 38 to 40 HRC. Fractographic analysis provided evidence favoring stress-corrosion cracking as the operating...