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semicrystalline thermoplastics

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Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003571
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., wear study is separated as elastomers, thermosets, glassy thermoplastics, and semicrystalline thermoplastics. The article describes the effects of environment and lubricant on the wear failures of polymers. It presents a case study on nylon as a tribological material. The article explains the wear...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006850
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
...," and "semicrystalline thermoplastics." The article also discusses the effects of environment and lubricant on the wear failures of polymers. It presents a case study on considering nylon as a tribological material and failure examples, explaining wear resistance of polyurethane elastomeric coatings and failure...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006925
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... crystallinity. Such polymers are termed semicrystalline because the degree of crystallinity never reaches 100%; they include such important thermoplastics as PE and nylons (or polyamides). Most polymers, however, have either very little or no true crystallinity and are generally referred to as noncrystalline...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006864
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
..., although for pressure pipe and conduit extrusion the MFI can be as low as 0.04 g/10 min. Notably, materials to be used in profile extrusion have an MFI of ~4 to 5 g/10 min, while materials that will be thermoformed after extrusion typically have an MFI of ~3 to 4 g/10 min. Semicrystalline thermoplastics...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006940
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... situations due to multiaxial loading or under uniaxial loading in the presence of notches and stress concentrations. Most of the research done on fatigue behavior of semicrystalline thermoplastics is focused on uniaxial (tension-tension or tension-compression) loading conditions. However, a small number...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006917
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... effect allows the chemical to interact and alter the polymer structure more easily. For semicrystalline thermoplastics, a possible scenario for introducing this mobility was described by evaluating intrinsic crazing, which is crazing induced solely by stress and not accelerated by chemical effects ( Ref...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006922
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... and should not be an issue for a properly molded semicrystalline plastic. The temperature demands are low; thus, a highly engineered thermoplastic or thermoset is not required but could be an option if environmental demands change. Three materials that remain after the funneling process are polyacetal (POM...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006923
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... integrity of the polymer is lost (a melting process for semicrystalline polymers, or complete liquidlike flow above T g for linear, amorphous polymers). All polymers, ranging from simple, linear thermoplastics to filled, cross-linked resins, exhibit these different regimes of behavior...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006941
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... distinctions that highlight the chemical, physical, and compositional differences between plastics include thermoplastic versus thermosetting, amorphous versus semicrystalline, and filled versus unfilled. An additional material-dependent factor shows up when the influence of processing on the properties...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006934
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... molecules, their nature (thermosets, rubbers, and thermoplastics), and/or their temperature and rate-dependency characteristics. For instance, it has been shown that the presence of the crystalline phase in thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene (PE) impacts the creep properties. At a fixed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006915
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... ). The term engineering resin or engineering plastic usually refers only to thermoplastics, which can be molded and remolded to shape, and excludes thermosets such as epoxy resins that cure into an infusible solid. Some rubbers (e.g., polyurethanes) that are cured or vulcanized are nevertheless classed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006849
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... Abstract This article addresses some established protocols for characterizing thermoplastics and whether they are homogeneous resins, alloyed, or blended compositions or highly modified thermoplastic composites. It begins with a discussion on characterizing mechanical, rheological, and thermal...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006931
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
...; the particular state—whether amorphous, semicrystalline, or crystalline; and the nature of any network structure. These elements, by which all polymers can be classified, are illustrated in Fig. 2 and described with examples in Table 1 . Clearly, there should be no network structure or cross-linking...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006918
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... Abstract This article reviews generalized test methodologies for fatigue characterization of polymers and examines fatigue fracture mechanisms in different engineering plastics. It provides detailed micromechanistic images of crack-tip processes for a variety of semicrystalline and amorphous...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006944
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... of Polymers under Stress The simple structure of a polymer consists of a random arrangement of chain molecules; such materials are referred to as amorphous polymers or glassy thermoplastics. In amorphous polymers, the chain molecules are randomly intertwined to form the material. The cohesive energy...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006932
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... are included in this category. Stress support is a consequence of an increase in modulus that occurs as cooling proceeds through the T g , below the melt temperature, T m , or at the cure temperature. When thermoplastics or semicrystalline polymers are cooled from the outside in, the solidification...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.9781627083959
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003541
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... themselves into an orderly structure. In general, simple polymers (with little or no side branching) crystallize very easily. Crystallization is inhibited in heavily cross-linked (thermoset) polymers and in polymers containing bulky side groups. There are three categories of polymers: thermoplastics...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006865
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... categories of polymers: thermoplastics, thermosetting plastics, and elastomers. Thermoplastics have linear chain configurations where chains are joined by weak secondary bonds. The secondary bonds that hold adjacent macromolecules together are a direct result of the formation of molecular dipoles along...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006928
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... below their glass transition temperatures, glassy or semicrystalline polymers are weakly viscoelastic. For these polymers, test data based on a time-independent analysis will probably be adequate. As the temperature is increased, either by the environment or by heat given off during deformation...