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sample testing

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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 51 Effect of sample size on the fracture of notched samples tested in slow bending. Data are normalized to the sample size for comparison. b , specimen width; d , retained depth at bottom of notch More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 51 Effect of sample size on the fracture of notched samples tested in slow bending. Data are normalized to the sample size for comparison. b , specimen width; d , retained depth at bottom of notch More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 4 Weibull plot of first sample test. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 6 Weibull plot of second sample test. More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.auto.c9001732
EISBN: 978-1-62708-218-1
... the assembly would have been extremely difficult to simulate and time-consuming to conduct, it was decided to test the total assembly and analyze all failures on a system basis. The statistical analysis of failure data usually requires a large sample because of the scatter generally found in fatigue-life...
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 4 ( a ) Prepared shear test sample and corresponding sample. ( b ) The DIN 50162 standard used for fabricating the shear test samples and fixture More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 12 Charpy impact test results for A517 grade F, plate M. Compare with plate D in Fig. 4 . Both plates were produced by the same melting practice, and both were markedly superior to any of the A517 grade H samples tested. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Optical photograph of a peel test sample partially peeled to reveal the underside of the conversion-coated nickel-phosphorus laminate. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 2 The wear rates of the bearing samples in laboratory tests as functions of sliding distance (normal load: 15 N; sliding velocity: 1.67 m s −1 ) More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 12 Rust debris on immersion test sample. The wedge is still in place but is out of focus (×3). More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 13 Pitting of immersion test samples. a) Slot parallel to stud axis (×10). Note the crack-like defect zig-zagging from the notch tip. b) Slot perpendicular to stud axis (×30). Note pitted region and line extending from slot. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 7 Weibull plot comparing two test samples. More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 1 Laboratory-fatigue-tested cross member sample 1, showing cracking progression from internal fillet-welded diaphragm through channel side wall at location indicated by arrow. More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 4 Internal view of cracking on fatigue-tested sample 9. Cracking is evident at toes of both fillet welds, as indicated by arrows. More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 6 Fracture surface at fillet weld toe of fatigue-tested sample 9. The area denoted by “S” was removed for SEM examination, and a metallographic section was taken at location “M”. More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 7 Fracture surface at torque rod mounting hole on fatigue tested sample 9. More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 8 SEM image of fracture origin area at weld toe on fatigue tested sample 1. Ratchet mark at lower center is indicative of fatigue cracks initiating on different planes. 13×. More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 6 SEM micrographs of fracture surfaces in three-point bending test samples. (a) Steel A, with 0.01% Mo. (b) Steel B, with 0.09% Mo. (c) Steel C, with 0.21 % Mo. (d) Steel D, with 0.52% Mo. More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 2 Metallographic sample (a) and tensile test specimen (b) from the pigtail tubing. More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 26 Test samples of 410 stainless steel (19.05 mm diam × 50.80 mm length, or 0.75 in. diam × 2.00 in. length), hardened and oil quenched from 955 °C (1750 °F), tempered 1 h at temperature in air; all specimens from a single heat, 0.10% C, 12.50% Cr. (a) Effect of tempering temperature More