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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001035
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... of the failed axle did not, at this juncture, rule out or support either of the accident causation scenarios. However, it did give rise to an additional experiment. It was hypothesized that the material in the core of the axle was strain-rate sensitive. If this was so, and the failure of the core occurred...
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 18 Crack-growth rate ( da / dN ) as a function of the energy-release rate, J I , for a single-edge notched polycarbonate specimen with 0.33 mm (0.013 in.) thickness More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 19 Crack-growth rate ( da / dN ) as a function of the energy-release rate, J I (tearing energy), for a rubber compound. J Ic , critical energy-release rate More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 18 Change in behavior of a polymeric material with increasing strain rate and/or decreasing temperature. (a) Brittle behavior. (b) Limited ductility behavior. (c) Cold drawing behavior. (d) Rubbery behavior. Curve (a) could represent testing below the glass transition temperature. Source More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 42 Fatigue crack propagation rate versus stress intensity factor range. Fatigue striations may be present on the fracture surface for loading in the linear portion of the curve (Paris Law region), and permit analytical estimations of life to fracture. Just as fracture toughness varies More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 39 Temperature dependence of the strain-rate sensitivity of pure aluminum and alloy 2024. Note 2024-O becoming negative near room temperature. Source: Ref 63 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 45 Isolated cleavage facet within progressive high-growth-rate fatigue fracture of fully pearlitic steel, as viewed in the SEM More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Effect of strain rate on ductile-to-brittle transition temperature in body-centered cubic metals More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Schematic illustration of variation of fatigue-crack-growth rate, da / dN , with alternating stress intensity, Δ K , in steels, showing regions of primary crack-growth mechanisms. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 Pearson plot of crack-growth rate as a function of K for short surface cracks and through-cracks. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 13 Effect of hold time on the fatigue crack growth rate properties of 2.25Cr-1Mo cast steel. The 2 h hold time tests were performed in steam at 538 °C (100 °F). Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 13 Effect of acid concentration on the corrosion rate of iron completely immersed in aqueous solutions of three inorganic acids at room temperature. It should be noted that the scales for corrosion rate are not the same for all three charts. As discussed in text, the corrosion rate More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Rate of corrosion of unprotected steel in biologically active soil as a function of iron sulfide present More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Bands of normalized wear rate versus hardness for low-stress scratching, high-stress gouging, and impact wear. Low-stress scratching shows the strongest dependence on hardness, while impact abrasion shows the least. The scatter in the impact abrasion data suggests a growing More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 30 Correlation of hardness with wear rate for three materials. The two 50 HRC materials both exhibit the same low-stress scratching wear resistance. However, as the wear severity increases, the steel designed for ground-engaging tools (steel A) exhibits moderate improvements in gouging More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 13 Plot of specific wear rate versus amplitude of slip. Each core is the result of a separate investigation More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Graph showing the influence of load on the LME crack-growth rate for the experimental conditions described in text. Copper-free tensile strength at 1100 °C (2010 °F), % More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 11 The measured crack growth rate (crack length versus time) determined by optical measurements or fractographic evaluation used to validate life prediction estimates. In this example, for an aircraft wing, the predicted crack growth and the actual crack growth based on measured crack More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 13 Crack growth rate data for 2024-T3 aluminum at R = 0 ( example 2 ). Source: Ref 33 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 3 Variation of the fatigue crack growth rate as a function of temperature. (a) Temperature effect on fatigue crack threshold and growth rates. (b) Variation of fatigue crack growth rates at Δ K of 30 MPa m (27 ksi in. ) More