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phenolic resins

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001389
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
.... Associated Environments Many manufacturers use wood-flour-filled phenol formaldehyde molding material when making molding cases for small circuit breakers. The phenolic resin contains an accelerator, hexamethylene tetramine, which aids in setting the resin. Heat supplied by the molding press causes...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003571
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
...) show, among all polymers, very high wear resistance. Extremely poor wear resistance is demonstrated by polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polystyrene (PS), and phenolic resin. Figure 4 shows worn surfaces of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) ( Ref 19 ) and UHMWPE ( Ref 20 ). These polymer surfaces show scars...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003532
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... uses a device, called a mounting press, to provide the required pressure and heat to encapsulate the specimen with a thermosetting or thermoplastic mounting material. Common thermosetting resins include phenolic, diallyl phthalate, and epoxy, while methyl methacrylate is the most commonly used...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006765
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... sources of injurious effects. The most common mounting method uses a device, called a mounting press, to provide the required pressure and heat to encapsulate the specimen with a thermosetting or thermoplastic mounting material. Common thermosetting resins include phenolic, diallyl phthalate...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c9001491
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
...Abstract Abstract Two silica phenolic nozzle liners cracked during proof testing. The test consisted of pressuring the nozzles to 14.1 MPa (2050 psia) for 5 to 20 s. It was concluded that the failure was due to longitudinal cracking in the convergent exhaust-nozzle insulators, stemming from...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.power.c9001695
EISBN: 978-1-62708-229-7
... was cut into four ring sections approximately two inches in length to allow precision cutting in localized areas. Fifteen specimens were cut from the four ring sections using an aluminum oxide abrasive blade. The specimens were then mounted using a hot mount phenolic resin. Rough grinding...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003549
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... pullout during the polishing process. In some cases, plating over the scale prior to mounting the sample or impregnating the mount with resin after preparation can retain the scale for examination. Additional information is provided in the articles “Practices in Failure Analysis” and “Metallographic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006782
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... are sectioned carefully, mounted in a resin compound, ground, and polished to facilitate metallographic examination. The prepared cross sections are called metallurgical mounts and are prepared using standard metallographic techniques. Mounts are examined in the unetched and etched conditions. In the unetched...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003572
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... (such as phenolics, epoxy, etc.) may have low wear rates and higher strength than those with thermoplastics because a higher ratio of fiber is achievable with a thermoset matrix. Incorporation of fillers also can modify wear resistance of polymers up to the order of four. Solid lubricants mostly reduce wear...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003541
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... 7.4 Hydrogen NH 3 35 8.4 H 2 O 51 12.2 Source: Ref 1 , 2 In thermosetting polymers, covalent cross links or strong hydrogen bonds occur between polymer chains, resulting in three-dimensional networks of cross-linked molecular chains. Phenol formaldehyde is a good example...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006789
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... material is a composite containing various ingredients, such as oxides, carbides, graphite, fillers, and metallic particles or fibers, held together by a polymeric (usually phenolic) resin. Mild wear results from the formation of protective scales of compacted wear particles on the pad surface, including...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006757
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... polymers Table 1 Basic characteristics of engineering polymers Location (a) Characteristics Examples (b) 1 Flexible and crystallizable chains PEPPPVCPA 2 Cross-linked amorphous networks of flexible chains Phenol-formaldehyde cured rubberStyrenated polyester 3 Rigid chains PIs...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003522
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Flexible and crystallizable chains PEPPPVCPA 2 Cross-linked amorphous networks of flexible chains Phenol-formaldehyde cured rubberStyrenated polyester 3 Rigid chains PIs (ladder molecules) A Crystalline domains in a viscous network PETTerylene (Dacron)Cellulose acetate B Moderate cross...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003548
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006783
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006834
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
...), cast and machined brass or bronze, as well as injected thermoplastics such as polyamides (PA66) with additions of glass fibers (PA66-GF25–35), polyetheretherketone (PEEK), or phenolic resins. Fig. 7 Examples of cage/separator structures and materials. (a) Left to right: pressed low-carbon steel...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003524
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1