1-20 of 537 Search Results for

phase

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001828
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... the tests under controlled conditions. This paper deals with the failure of a bearing journal of a 6.7 mW HT pump under complex operating conditions that included a period of operation under two-phase flow conditions. A brief design description of the pump, its components, and the system in which...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001065
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... is approximately 190 °C (370 °F), with a pressure of approximately 2550 kPa (370 psig) and a maximum flow rate of 2.3 million kg/h (5 million lb/h). The fluid in the pipe at this point is considered to be liquid phase, with no vapor present. The elbow developed two ruptures. The ruptures were 100 mm (4...
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 In-phase and out-of-phase thermomechanical fatigue cycles. The term “phase” refers to the nature of the relationship between the mechanical strain and the temperature. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 “Diamond” cycle, showing both in-phase and out-of-phase character More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Effect of in-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP) cycling on the fatigue life of IN-738. (a) Strain life data for the various wave forms. (b) Cycles to crack initiation based on the maximum tensile stresses More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 45 Second-phase cleavage fracture in Ti-6Al-4V. (a) Light micrograph of polished and etched surface. (b) SEM of fracture surface. Source: Ref 10 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 22 Micrograph of specimen shown in Fig. 17 . Cleaved second-phase particles are visible in the microstructure, and no debonding at second-phase/matrix interfaces is visible. Source: Ref 42 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 77 Direct quenching from carburizing temperature. (a) Phase diagram schematic. (b) Continuous cooling transformation curve for a high-carbon surface. (c) Micrograph of direct quenched 3% Ni-Cr carburized steel. 280×. Source: Ref 30 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Flow diagram showing the relationship between the design phase and the investigative tasks for in-service failure, structural aging, and fitness-for-service of structural components More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 47 Copper-lead phase diagram. Source: Ref 18 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 39 Light micrograph showing sigma phase revealed by selective etching with 10N KOH (electrolytic). The brittle sigma phase caused extensive cracking in a 25%Cr-12%Ni cast heat treatment basket hook. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 57 Sigma (σ) phase in cast heat-resistant alloy HH, type II. Intermetallic phases, such as σ, can greatly reduce the ductility of many high-temperature alloys in service at temperatures from 480 to 955 °C (900 to 1750 °F). More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 12 Size change due to thermal changes and phase transformation. K, core; R, surface More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Influence of various properties of reinforcing phase on abrasive wear of composite. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 9 Photomicrograph of Secondary Crack Showing Third Phase within the Crack, Crack follows the Grain Boundaries (Intergranular). Etched, 2% Nital. 900× More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 10 Photomicrograph of third phase in secondary cracks of failed locomotive axle. Etched, 2%Nital. 175×. More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 11 Photomicrograph of third phase in secondary crack of failed locomotive axle. Etched, 2% Nital. 450× More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 14 EDS Scan at 30,000× in a secondary crack with third phase (identified as copper) of failed locomotive axle. More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Microstructure of component that cracked during quenching. Phase transformation from γ to α′ martensite was incomplete and indicative of cooling rate <50°C. More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 8 Precipitates under the scale layer, longitudinal section, unetched, phase contrast micrograph (−1). 100× More