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optical microscopes

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Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 3 The Zeiss EPI optical microscope was used for the on-side analysis because it could be disassembled and reassembled fairly quickly and without damage to the optics or illuminator. More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c9001530
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
.... The worn surfaces of samples and the wear debris were examined by light optical microscope, SEM, and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalyzer. It was found that the laboratory pin-on-disk wear data correlated well with the plant experience. It is suggested that the higher lead content ~18%) of the good...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001122
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... was conducted using optical microscope. Chemical composition of the hammerhead was determined by emission spectrometry. The chemical compositions of the chip and hammer head were compared using energy-dispersive analysis. Microhardness versus distance from the striking face was also determined. The hammerhead...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001380
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... Abstract One of the two AISI 4340 steel pitch horn bolts from the main rotor hub assembly failed while in service. Optical microscope revealed evidence of corrosion pitting in regions adjacent to the fracture. Fractographic examination utilizing a scanning electron microscope revealed multiple...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c0046227
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... taken with a scanning electron, and optical microscopic examination of the milled sections revealed extensive pitting on both sides of the floors. Evidence found supports the conclusions that the floors failed by fatigue cracking that initiated near the center of the fuel-tank floor and ultimately...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001102
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... Abstract Four cadmium-plated ASTM A193 grade B studs from a steam line connector associated with a power turbine failed unexpectedly in a nil-ductility manner. Fracture surfaces were covered with a light-colored, lustrous deposit. Optical microscope, SEM, and EDS analyses were conducted...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001334
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... Abstract Leaks developed at random locations in aluminum brass condenser tubes within the first year of operation of a steam condenser in a nuclear power plant. One failed tube underwent scanning electron microscopy surface examination and optical microscope metallography. It was determined...
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 28 Computer-controlled digital microscopic optical scanning electron microscope Z -stack image of exemplar crankshaft fracture with light-emitting diode ring light illumination More
Image
Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 5 Longitudinal microstructures of EEIPS wire: ( a ) an image taken by SEM, and ( b ) an optical microscope image. Structure are of pearlite and ferrite that are severely deformed and aligned in loading direction More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Silicon nitride rod broken in uniaxial tension. Fracture origin is at the top of the image. Optical microscope; reflected light (direct illumination); picture width ∼5 mm More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Silicon nitride rod broken in uniaxial tension. Fracture origin is just to the left of the center of the rod. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼5 mm More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 5 Microstructure of the failed splint: ( a ) overall morphology of the cross-section by SEM, ( b–e ) microstructure observed by optical microscope, and ( f ) crack-tip regions observed by SEM More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Fracture surface of a glass plate broken in bending. The fracture origin is at the top edge of the fracture surface, to the left of the center of the image. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼1 mm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Silicon nitride rod broken in uniaxial tension. The same rod shown in Fig. 5 . Fracture origin is at the top of the image. Optical microscope; reflected light (oblique illumination); picture width ∼5 mm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 Fracture surface of a piece of glass broken by striking it with a hammer. Origin is at the lower left; the wavelike lines are Wallner lines. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼3 mm. Source: Ref 3 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Fracture surface of an electrical porcelain insulator. The fracture origin is at the top center of the image. The relatively smooth fracture mirror is bordered by mist and velocity hackle. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼4 mm More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 18 Vickers indentation site on a glass surface. The dark lines are radial cracks that are normal to the surface; the bright areas are subsurface lateral cracks that are nearly parallel to the surface. Optical microscope; reflected light (differential interference contrast) More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 8 Fracture surface of a glass rod broken in bending. The fracture origin is at the top center of the image. Wallner lines are seen in the fracture mirror, which is bordered by mist and velocity hackle. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼2 mm More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 16 Silicon nitride rod broken in bending. Fracture origin is at the top of the image. The horizontal line near the bottom of the image is the cantilever curl, typical of bending failure as the fracture approaches the compression side. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼5 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 Cellulose acetate replica of the fracture surface of a glazed electrical porcelain insulator. The fracture markings in the glaze, in particular, clearly indicate that the fracture started in the porcelain, not in the glaze (fracture moved from the porcelain into the glaze). Optical More