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maximum service temperatures

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.power.c0048299
EISBN: 978-1-62708-229-7
... cause of failure was concluded to be exfoliation of the scale from the ID surface of the tube. Creep failures were interpreted to be caused by localized temperatures higher than the maximum service temperature. Replacement of the affected tubes was recommended. Inspection of the tubes by radiography...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.power.c0048158
EISBN: 978-1-62708-229-7
... of fracture from torsional loading (along a plane 45 deg to the wire axis). Liquid-metal embrittlement was expected to have been caused by metals (Sn, Zn, Pb) which melt much below maximum service temperature of the turbine. The springs were concluded to have fractured by intergranular stress-corrosion...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.modes.c0046476
EISBN: 978-1-62708-234-1
... containing more than 0.03% carbon had been sensitized and placed in contact in service with a corrosive medium at temperatures in the sensitizing range. Recommendations included changing material for the pot from type 304 stainless steel to Hastelloy N (70Ni-17Mo-7Cr-5Fe). Maximum corrosion resistance...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c0046205
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
...Abstract Abstract The splined shaft (1040 steel, heat treated to a hardness of 44 to 46 HRC and a tensile strength of approximately 1448 MPa, or 210 ksi) from a front-end loader used in a salt-handling area broke after being in service approximately two weeks while operating at temperatures...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.power.c9001571
EISBN: 978-1-62708-229-7
... is a progress report on the quantification of changes in both the degree of carbide precipitation and delta ferrite content and shape in the cladding as a function of temperature and time to refine the estimates of the maximum temperatures experienced. Delta ferrite Hot cracking Nuclear power reactors...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001346
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... dry for some time. The normal operating temperature should be 325 °C (616 °F). ASTM B 407-88 specifies 595 °C (1100 °F) as the maximum service temperature for Alloy UNS N08800. The time-temperature-precipitation diagram for Alloy 800 presented in Lippold's paper ( Ref 3 ) indicates...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.marine.c9001657
EISBN: 978-1-62708-227-3
... that exhibited a transverse fracture located some 15–20 mm from the blade root, Figure 1 . The engine had operated at a maximum service temperature of 815 C and since its installation it had operated for 7000 h with 3000 start-ups. Apparently the engine failure occurred shortly after the ship's power...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001081
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... structure ( Fig. 8 ). There were no obvious differences in the microstructures of the bore and rim sections. This was not unexpected, because the maximum service temperature that this component experiences (∼200 °C, or 390 °F) is not severe enough to cause microstructural degradation. Fig. 8 Typical...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001813
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
...-melting metals and alloys. Tin, lead, and zinc melt below the maximum service temperature of the turbine, which was 462 °C (864 °F). One Sn-Zn system had a eutectic melting point of less than 204 °C (400 °F). Such metals can cause liquid-metal embrittlement at temperatures above their melting points...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003555
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
...Suggested maximum temperatures for various alloys in continuous, isothermal oxidizing atmospheres without excessive scaling Table 1 Suggested maximum temperatures for various alloys in continuous, isothermal oxidizing atmospheres without excessive scaling Alloy designation Temperature...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003551
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... to the maximum service temperature, the microstructural stability, and dimensional integrity under changing thermal environments in relation to the thermal stress and thermal shock resistances. The main criteria to meet the chemical qualifications is the corrosion resistance. Durability for refractories...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003517
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... rupture may occur ( Ref 3 ), as described in more detail in the article “Creep and Stress Rupture Failures” in this Volume. Elevated-Temperature Fatigue In service, the steady loads or stresses to which components are subjected often are accompanied by mechanically induced cyclic loads...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006836
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... below the maximum service temperature of the turbine, which was 462 °C (864 °F). One tin-zinc system had a eutectic melting point of less than 204 °C (400 °F). Such metals can cause liquid-metal embrittlement at temperatures above their melting points. Sodium, tin, and zinc could have been present...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003512
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... of an LNG pressure vessel due to a possible welding defect and improperly heat treated material resulting in subsequent fatigue crack growth Selection and development of materials with improved toughness at the service temperature of −160 °C (−250 °F) Comet aircraft failures ( Ref 10 ) 1950s Fatigue...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006802
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... perspectives on failure and life assessment of components, structural design philosophies, the role of the failure analyst in life assessment, and the role of nondestructive inspection. They also cover fatigue life assessment, elevated-temperature life assessment, fitness-for-service life assessment, brittle...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001816
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
...) hotter than the rest of the circuit. At 650 °C (1200 °F), ASME SA-213, grade T-11, is above its usual oxidation limit or maximum service temperature of 550 °C (1025 °F). Such service temperatures resulted in the creep failures and the low reliability reported on this unit. Recommendations Because...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003573
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... service stresses had exceeded the strength of the material in a region of mixed martensite and ferrite. It was determined that the most likely cause of the mixed structure was nonuniform austenitization during heat treatment. The end that bent never became fully austenitic, because the furnace temperature...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006797
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... time and degrade properties, allowing distortion and even fracture to occur. For example, if a martensitic steel is tempered at a given temperature and then encounters a higher temperature in service, yield strength and tensile strength will decrease because of overtempering. Long-time exposure...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003546
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... reduction in throttle flow is due to reduced power requirements during some portions of service duty cycle. However, these fluctuations are shown to have negligible effect on the magnitude of the stresses. Source: Ref 14 Fig. 4 Effective temperature in a TMF cycle as a function of the maximum...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.chem.c9001738
EISBN: 978-1-62708-220-4
.... This was done to create a test situation as close as possible to the real situation. The material taken from the manifold had undergone a diametrical expansion of 1.75% during service. A stress of 12 MPa was chosen, which is 20% higher than the hoop stress. Temperatures of 900 to 1015°C were used during...