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low-alloy steels

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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Strength-hardness correlation for carbon and low-alloy steels. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 3 Service failure of a low-alloy steel nut by LMIE. Cadmium-plated, 4140 low-alloy steel (44 HRC) nuts were inadvertently used on bolts for clamps used to join ducts that carried hot (500 °C, or 930 °F) air from the compressor of a military jet engine. (a) The nuts were fragmented More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Fracture surface of cast 10-cm (4-in.) high-strength low-alloy steel chain link that failed because of internal hydrogen-assisted cracking. Note hydrogen flake. 0.25× More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Low-alloy steel conveyor pipe that cracked at fillet welds securing a carbon steel flange because of poor fit-up. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Section through weld in a roadarm (a weldment of low-alloy steel castings). The roadarm fractured in the HAZ because of high carbon-equivalent content. Fracture surface is at arrow. 0.8× More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Low-alloy steel roller bearing from an improperly grounded electric motor that was pitted and etched by electrolytic action of stray electric currents in the presence of moisture. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 14 Fatigue failure of a low-alloy steel part. Shear lips around most of the periphery (as at arrows) as well as chevron marks over most of the fracture surface aid in identifying the fatigue fracture area at the lower left corner. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Brittle (a) and ductile (b) crack paths in fractured low alloy steel specimens (both electroless nickel-plated for edge preservation and etched with 2% nital). More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Sand-cast low-alloy steel eye connector from a floating-bridge pontoon that broke under static tensile loading. (a) Schematic illustration of pontoon bridge and enlarged view of eye and clevis connectors showing location of fracture in eye connector. (b) A fracture surface of the eye More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 20 Highway-truck equalizer beam, sand cast from low-alloy steel, that fractured because of mechanical cracking. (a) Fracture surface; detail A shows increments (regions B, C, D, and E) in which crack propagation occurred sequentially. Dimensions given in inches. (b) Micrograph More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 45 Low-alloy steel conveyor pipe that cracked at fillet welds securing a carbon steel flange because of poor fit-up. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 16 Mechanical properties of quenched and tempered low-alloy steel (0.30–0.50 wt% C) as determined by Patton. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 17 Mechanical properties of quenched and tempered low-alloy steel (0.30–0.45 wt% C) as determined by Janitsky and Baeyertz. Source: Ref 12 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Comparison of wear surfaces for low-alloy steel specimens worn in (a) flow-through and (b) recycled slurry tests for 1 h and 1.67 h, respectively. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 Low-alloy steel roller bearing from an improperly grounded electric motor that was pitted and etched by electrolytic action of stray electric currents in the presence of moisture. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Sand-cast low-alloy steel eye connector from a floating-bridge pontoon that broke under static tensile loading. (a) Schematic illustration of pontoon bridge and enlarged view of eye and clevis connectors showing location of fracture in eye connector. (b) A fracture surface of the eye More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Highway-truck equalizer beam, sand cast from low-alloy steel, that fractured because of mechanical cracking. (a) Fracture surface; detail A shows increments (regions B, C, D, and E) in which crack propagation occurred sequentially. Dimensions given in inches. (b) Micrograph More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 4 Service failure of a low-alloy steel nut by liquid-metal-induced embrittlement (LMIE). Cadmium-plated, 4140 low-alloy steel (44 HRC) nuts were inadvertently used on bolts for clamps used to join ducts that carried hot (500 °C, or 930 °F) air from the compressor of a military jet engine More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 21 (a) Evolution of wear rate of a flat-on-flat low-alloyed steel contact as a function of the mean contact pressure for gross slip fretting sliding. Adapted from Ref 77 . (b) Johnson diagram displaying the various elastic and elastoplastic responses of metals as a function of the mean More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 53 Fatigue striations in a vanadium high-strength, low-alloy steel. (a) Longitudinal-transverse orientation; stress-intensity range (Δ K ) = 32.3 to 34.3 M P a m (29.4 to 31.2 ksi in .); and fatigue crack growth rate ( da / dN ) = 3.3 to 3.8 × 10 −5 cm/cycle. (b More