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low-alloy steel

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.machtools.c0089534
EISBN: 978-1-62708-223-5
... Abstract The specially designed sand-cast low-alloy steel jaws that were implemented to stretch the wire used in prestressed concrete beams fractured. The fractures were found to be macroscale brittle and exhibited very little evidence of deformation. The surface of the jaws was disclosed...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.bldgs.c0089530
EISBN: 978-1-62708-219-8
... Abstract A sand-cast steel eye connector used to link together two 54,430 kg capacity floating-bridge pontoons failed prematurely in service. The pontoons were coupled by upper and lower eye and clevis connectors that were pinned together. The eye connector was found to be cast from low-alloy...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c0047939
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
... Abstract Rough operation of the roller bearing mounted in an electric motor/gearbox assembly was observed. The bearing components made of low-alloy steel (4620 or 8620) and the cup, cone and rollers were carburized, hardened and tempered. The contact surfaces of these components (cup, cone...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001813
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
..., the formation of graphite nodules in carbon and low alloy steels, contributes to many failures in high-temperature environments. Three such failures in power-generating systems were analyzed to demonstrate the unpredictable nature of this failure mechanism and its effect on material properties and structures...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001337
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... examined. It was concluded that preferential nucleations of graphite nodules in a series of bands weakened the steel locally, producing preferred fracture paths. Formation of these graphite bands probably expedited the creep failure of the tube. Future failures may be avoided by using low-alloy steels...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001072
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Sand-cast low-alloy steel eye connector from a floating-bridge pontoon that broke under static tensile loading. (a) Schematic illustration of pontoon bridge and enlarged view of eye and clevis connectors showing location of fracture in eye connector. (b) A fracture surface of the eye More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Highway-truck equalizer beam, sand cast from low-alloy steel, that fractured because of mechanical cracking. (a) Fracture surface; detail A shows increments (regions B, C, D, and E) in which crack propagation occurred sequentially. Dimensions given in inches. (b) Micrograph More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Fracture surface of cast 10-cm (4-in.) high-strength low-alloy steel chain link that failed because of internal hydrogen-assisted cracking. Note hydrogen flake. 0.25× More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Low-alloy steel conveyor pipe that cracked at fillet welds securing a carbon steel flange because of poor fit-up. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Section through weld in a roadarm (a weldment of low-alloy steel castings). The roadarm fractured in the HAZ because of high carbon-equivalent content. Fracture surface is at arrow. 0.8× More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Low-alloy steel roller bearing from an improperly grounded electric motor that was pitted and etched by electrolytic action of stray electric currents in the presence of moisture. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 14 Fatigue failure of a low-alloy steel part. Shear lips around most of the periphery (as at arrows) as well as chevron marks over most of the fracture surface aid in identifying the fatigue fracture area at the lower left corner. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Sand-cast low-alloy steel eye connector from a floating-bridge pontoon that broke under static tensile loading. (a) Schematic illustration of pontoon bridge and enlarged view of eye and clevis connectors showing location of fracture in eye connector. (b) A fracture surface of the eye More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 20 Highway-truck equalizer beam, sand cast from low-alloy steel, that fractured because of mechanical cracking. (a) Fracture surface; detail A shows increments (regions B, C, D, and E) in which crack propagation occurred sequentially. Dimensions given in inches. (b) Micrograph More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 45 Low-alloy steel conveyor pipe that cracked at fillet welds securing a carbon steel flange because of poor fit-up. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 34 Low-alloy steel roller bearing from an improperly grounded electric motor that was pitted and etched by electrolytic action of stray electric currents in the presence of moisture More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 47 Low-alloy steel conveyor pipe that cracked at fillet weld securing a carbon steel flange because of poor fit-up. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 20 Beach marks on (a) quenched-and-tempered alloy steel pin fractured in low-cycle fatigue ( Ref 4 ), and on (b) maraging steel stud fractured in the laboratory by stress-corrosion cracking under steady load ( Ref 16 ). The presence of beach marks is indicative of progressive cracking More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 58 Gas porosity in electron beam welds of low-carbon steel and titanium alloy. (a) Gas porosity in a weld in rimmed AISI 1010 steel. Etched with 5% nital. 30×. (b) Massive voids in weld centerline of 50 mm (2 in.) thick titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. 1.2× More