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interatomic bonds

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001812
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... of interatomic bonds at surfaces and crack tips, which facilitates dislocationemission or decohesion. There are, however, a few systems, such as the Al–Ga and Ni–Bi couples [ 15 , 16 ], where the embrittling atoms diffuse rapidly along grain boundaries (even in unstressed material). This results in liquid films...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006822
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... in the circumferential direction. This angle typically was cut into the edges of the plate prior to forming and welding to increase the bond area. Because lap welding occurs at elevated temperatures, and pipeline steel can start to melt at 1455 °C (2650 °F), manufacturers were challenged by a relatively small...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003537
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006774
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
...-Level and Microscopic Structure Two important submicroscopic variables are the type of bonding between atoms (ionic, covalent, metallic, and van der Waals) and whether the material in question is or is not crystalline. Metallic materials are metallically bonded and are typically crystalline...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003538
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... to the slip plane causes alternate rupture and self-healing of the interatomic bonds, resulting in permanent deformation. A normal stress applied to the body causes only continued separation of atoms and therefore brittle cleavage fracture. Fig. 2 Schematic figure showing the effect of a normal stress...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006775
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... to first examine what is meant by cleavage in crystalline materials. Figure 2 is often used to illustrate the differences in mechanisms for slip and cleavage. A shear stress applied to the material parallel to the slip plane causes alternate rupture and self-healing of the interatomic bonds, resulting...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003552
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... the material by lowering the bond strength between metal atoms. This theory is the one that is most applicable to the type of hydrogen embrittlement generally found in newly processed parts that crack during shipping or are found cracked at some point during the assembly process. Grain boundaries of steel...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006784
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
.... The decohesion theory ( Ref 2 ) holds that dissolved hydrogen tends to migrate toward regions of hydrostatic (often termed as triaxial) tensile stress and weakens the material by lowering the bond strength between metal atoms. This theory is the one that is most applicable to the type of hydrogen embrittlement...