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high-alloy steel

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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Fracture surface of cast 10-cm (4-in.) high-strength low-alloy steel chain link that failed because of internal hydrogen-assisted cracking. Note hydrogen flake. 0.25× More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 53 Fatigue striations in a vanadium high-strength, low-alloy steel. (a) Longitudinal-transverse orientation; stress-intensity range (Δ K ) = 32.3 to 34.3 M P a m (29.4 to 31.2 ksi in .); and fatigue crack growth rate ( da / dN ) = 3.3 to 3.8 × 10 −5 cm/cycle. (b More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006816
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... and/or carbon levels even though the chemistry, on the average, is to specification. This defect is most prevalent in high-alloy and resulfurized steels, although it can be present in other steels. This issue can cause distortion problems and can result in nonuniform case hardness or core hardness values...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001824
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
.... However, the investigation (which included visual, macroscopic, metallographic, SEM, and chemical analysis) showed that austenitic stainless steel and a nickel-base alloy were used instead. The unspecified materials are more prone to corrosion, particularly galvanic corrosion, which proved...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.petrol.c0047606
EISBN: 978-1-62708-228-0
... adjacent to the welds. Use of highly stressed austenitic stainless steels in high-chloride environments having a temperature above 65 deg C (150 deg F) should be discouraged. Solution annealing or shot peening to reduce residual stresses may be advisable. If heat treatment is not feasible after welding...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003552
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... followed by rapid cooling Hydrogen attack Steels subject to combined high-temperature and high-pressure hydrogen. Also affects copper Irreversible chemical reactions of hydrogen with matrix or alloy elements form high-pressure pockets of gases other than molecular hydrogen. Cracking from hydride...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006828
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... temperature, time, atmosphere, or flux; conditions of the faying surfaces; postbraze cleaning; and service conditions. Brazeability Brazeability is a term that was coined for the relative ease at which a material may be brazed. Low-carbon steels, copper, and copper alloys (except the high-lead...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.power.c9001208
EISBN: 978-1-62708-229-7
... Abstract A spindle made of hardenable 13% chromium steel X40 Cr13 (Material No. 1.4034) that was fastened to a superheated steam push rod made of high temperature structural steel 13Cr-Mo44 (Material No. 1.7335) by means of a convex fillet weld, fractured at the first operation of the rod...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.modes.c9001705
EISBN: 978-1-62708-234-1
..., this choice also has its drawbacks. Although it has high tensile strength, it has low resistance to nonoxidizing acids, [ 14 ]. Furthermore, high nickel-chromium alloys (such as Inconel) show poor resistance to liquid tin at 300 and 600°C. Nickel-chromium steels suffer rupture failures when stressed...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c9001581
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... to the lower creep strength in the low carbon alloy. The nickel content of the wire was at the high end of the Type 304 stainless steel specification. This high nickel content improved the drawing capability so that it was similar to that of Type 305 stainless steel. Type 305 stainless steel generally has...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.bldgs.c0091201
EISBN: 978-1-62708-219-8
..., and 5x/10x images etched in ASTM 89 reagent) supported the conclusion that the pitting in the austenitic stainless steel pipe was believed to be caused by damage to the passive layer brought about by a combination of MIC, high chloride levels, and high total dissolved solids. The low-flow and stagnant...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003553
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... is approximately 241 MPa (35 ksi) for high-alloy stainless steel and approximately 83 MPa (12 ksi) for 18-8 stainless steel. Fig. 3 Relative SCC behavior of austenitic stainless steels in boiling magnesium chloride. Source: Ref 11 Threshold Stress Intensity For most metal-environment...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.steel.c9001225
EISBN: 978-1-62708-232-7
... to be anticipated. In view of the required oxidation resistance, a chromium-silicon or chromium-aluminum steel with 6 or 13% Cr would have been adequate (Materials Nos. 1.4712 or 1.4713, or 1.4722 or 1.4724, respectively). If the high temperature strength of these steels proved inadequate, an alloy lower...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.pulp.c0091622
EISBN: 978-1-62708-230-3
.... If redesign was impossible, an alloy more resistant to Cl-SCC, such as a duplex stainless steel or a high-molybdenum (4 to 6%) austenitic stainless steel, should be used. Chlorides Digesters Paper machines CF-8M UNS J92900 Stress-corrosion cracking A CF-8M (cast type 316) neck liner or manway...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001046
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... by 76.5 mm (3.0 in.) OD by 1.6 mm (0.06in.) thick. Three austenitic stainless steels (types 304, 309, and 316) and five high-nickel alloys (Inconel [1] alloys 600 and 625, Incoloy [1] alloys 800 and 825, and Inco [1] alloy C-276) were chosen for the test rack. All of the coupons were taken from...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.petrol.c0048808
EISBN: 978-1-62708-228-0
... metal. Fine cracks starting inside the weld zone and spreading outward through the weld and toward the surface were observed during examination. Decarburization and graphitization of the carbon steel at the interface was noted. The high carbon level was found to allow martensite to form eventually...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003555
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... have been successfully used at service temperatures of 750 to 1200 °C (1400 to 2200 °F). Manganese, silicon, and aluminum additions improve the resistance of nickel alloys to sulfur attack ( Ref 21 ). Scaling rates of high-temperature stainless steels are higher in dry sulfur dioxide environments...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c9001717
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... for high-hardness, brittle steels with a predominantly martensitic structure, such as tool steels, high-carbon steels and martensitic stainless steels, and should be done with the specimen in the as-quenched or lightly tempered condition. Even though the maraging 300 steel is a low-carbon alloy...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001838
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... or an induction coil, at temperatures well below the melting point of the alloy. In austenitic stainless steels, the melting of these grain boundary films can start at temperatures as low as 900 °C [ 4 ]. Materials Testing Results Chemical Composition The chemical composition of the investigated steel...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.modes.c0047010
EISBN: 978-1-62708-234-1
... Abstract When bulging occurred in mortar tubes made of British I steel during elevated-temperature test firing, a test program was formulated to evaluate the high-temperature properties (at 540 to 650 deg C, or 1000 to 1200 deg F) of the British I steel and of several alternative alloys...