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heat treated high-strength alloys

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c0046205
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
...Abstract Abstract The splined shaft (1040 steel, heat treated to a hardness of 44 to 46 HRC and a tensile strength of approximately 1448 MPa, or 210 ksi) from a front-end loader used in a salt-handling area broke after being in service approximately two weeks while operating at temperatures...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.conag.c0047479
EISBN: 978-1-62708-221-1
.... The tooth was cast in ultrahigh-strength low-alloy steel that had been heat treated to a hardness of 555 HB. Fig. 1 Ultrahigh-strength steel dragline bucket tooth that failed due to environmental hydrogen-assisted cracking. See also Fig. 2 . Investigation Conclusions Corrective Measures...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c0047428
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... steel tooth. Given the small critical crack sizes characteristic of ultrahigh-strength materials, it is generally unwise to weld them. It is particularly inadvisable to hardface ultrahigh-strength steel parts with hard, brittle, crack-prone materials when high service stresses will be encountered...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.usage.c0047423
EISBN: 978-1-62708-236-5
... material had not been used to make the weld. Repair welds in high-strength steel castings should always be made with low-hydrogen filler materials. Filler metals Heat affected zone Repair welding Fe-0.18C-1.37Ni-0.42Cr-0.31Mo Fatigue fracture Joining-related failures A large shackle used...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c9001685
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
.../asm.hb.v11.a0003552 Components requiring a combination of high strength and reasonably good ductility are often made from the uranium-0.8 wt % titanium (U-0.8 Ti) alloy. Typically, these alloys are processed by vacuum solution heat treating above 723°C (γ-phase), quenching in water to produce...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003573
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... to a fiber stress just above the tensile strength, as shown in Fig. 4 where the lower curve became essentially horizontal. This collapse load agrees with the limit-analysis collapse load of 1.5 times the load at yield. The beam made of stainless steel, which strain hardens at a rather high rate, showed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006797
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... be clear from this discussion, surface hardness testing cannot completely characterize a case. Mistakes made in heat treating hardenable alloys are among the most common causes of premature failure. Temperatures that are either too high or too low can result in the development of inadequate...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001776
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... 3 C) possess very high values of hardness [ 14 – 16 ]. The hardness of such carbides is well established and reported to be between 910 and 1050 HV [ 15 ]. The observed low impact strength is attributed to carbide precipitates because they are unknown to increase the wear resistance of the crusher...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c9001260
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
...Abstract Abstract One percent Cr-Mo low alloy constructional steel is widely used for high tensile applications, e.g., for manufacture of high tensile fasteners, heat treated shafts and axles, for automobile applications such as track pins for high duty tracked vehicles etc. The steel is fairly...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c9001707
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... heat treated to high strength levels (i.e. H950 and H1000 tempers) and subsequently chromium plated. This evidence led to the conclusion that hydrogen embrittlement was the primary mechanism of cracking and consequent failure in the link and pistons. Hydrogen embrittlement results from the combined...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003510
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... = 2 h. (b) Assume t = ∞. The following are recommendations with respect to the tempering process ( Ref 4 ): Generally, the higher the tempering temperature, the greater the resulting ductility and toughness. However, this is at the expense of strength and hardness. High-carbon steels...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001809
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... UNS designation is typically between C95200 and C95900. Because of the high aluminum content, NAB alloys generally have very high corrosion resistance in seawater, chlorides, and dilute acids. Additional corrosion resistance is obtained with the use of nickel, which also increases the alloy’s yield...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c9001504
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... problems, troublesome failure mechanisms, the role of high strength aluminum alloys and steels, and situations where fracture mechanics analyses provided insight into the failures. The two main failure mechanisms were: fatigue occurring mainly in steel components, and corrosion related problems...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.auto.c0089572
EISBN: 978-1-62708-218-1
... before the castings were heat treated. The pattern of crack growth suggested a service condition involving many relatively low applied stresses and occasional high loads. Three changes in processing were recommended: better gating and risering in the foundry to achieve sounder castings, better...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003553
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... values of this parameter for maraging steels heat treated to various yield strengths and then exposed to aqueous environments are given subsequently in this article, along with a general description of the relationship of the rate of cracking to stress intensity for maraging steels and for other high...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.modes.c0047199
EISBN: 978-1-62708-234-1
... from extruded stock. The increased resistance to exfoliation observed on forgings from rolled stock is attributable to a more favorable randomized grain structure induced by the rolling process. Thus, for optimizing exfoliation corrosion resistance of high-strength forgings, rolled bar stock should...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.modes.c9001455
EISBN: 978-1-62708-234-1
... corrosion can also occur in the high strength aluminium-zinc copper alloys (DTD.683). Over-ageing, e.g. heating to 185°C for 24 hours, was also suggested as a means of eliminating susceptibility, but this also led to a loss in strength of approximately one ton per square inch. As an alternative, six hours...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006785
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... and industries that have experienced SCC failures include (this list is not exhaustive): Aerospace: Aluminum alloys in structural aircraft components such as landing gear and wing components, stainless steel tubing used as part of the hydraulic or fuel systems, high-strength low-alloy steel...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.usage.c9001722
EISBN: 978-1-62708-236-5
... embrittlement and (2) minimise the reduction of fatigue strength due to plating, are conflicting. The heat treatment must therefore be selected to suit the particular components, the following information being given for guidance: The fatigue limit of high tensile steel components may be markedly reduced...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006784
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... alloys 825, G and G-3, and alloy 20Cb3, as well as austenitic nickel-base alloys with correspondingly high iron contents. Large reductions in the ductility of nickel-base alloys due to hydrogen embrittlement have been observed at strain rates near 10 −4 to 10 −6 s −1 . Only when the strength level...