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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c0046388
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... Abstract The bolt in a bolt and thimble assembly used to connect a wire rope to a crane hanger bracket was worn excessively. Two worn bolts, one new bolt, and a new thimble were examined. Specifications required the bolts to be made of 4140 steel heat treated to a hardness of 277 to 321 HRB...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c0048052
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... occurred in links having hardness values in the range of 375 to 444 HRB. It was revealed by the supplier that the previous hardness level of 302 to 375 HRB was increased to minimize wear which made the links were made notch sensitive and resulted in fractures that initiated at the butt-weld flash...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c9001207
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... Abstract Pipes made of low-carbon Thomas steel had been welded longitudinally employing the carbon-arc process with bare electrode wire made for argon-shielded arc welding. Difficulties were encountered during the cutting of threads because of the presence of hard spots. Microstructural...
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 5 Map of hardness of outside surface of piece 5-1-D, compiled from hardness measurements using Rockwell hardness tests (subsequently, converted to Knoop hardness) and Knoop hardness measurements. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 22 AISI S7 punch that had a low surface hardness after heat treatment and was given a second carburizing treatment, then rehardened. Cracking was observed after this retreatment (the cracks have been accentuated with magnetic particles). Coarse circumferential machining marks were present More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 51 Case-hardness traverse of section used for Fig. 50 taken from tooth shown in Fig. 49(b) . More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Effect of abrasive hardness on wear behavior of metals and ceramics. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Abrasion resistance versus hardness for various material types in high-stress pin abrasion tests (silicon carbide abrasive). Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 Influence of hardness and E /σ y on dominant wear mechanism. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 11 Schematic relationship between wear resistance, hardness, and fracture toughness. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 12 Effect of microstructure and hardness on the abrasion resistance of steels: high-stress abrasion, alumina abrasive. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Bands of normalized wear rate versus hardness for low-stress scratching, high-stress gouging, and impact wear. Low-stress scratching shows the strongest dependence on hardness, while impact abrasion shows the least. The scatter in the impact abrasion data suggests a growing More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 30 Correlation of hardness with wear rate for three materials. The two 50 HRC materials both exhibit the same low-stress scratching wear resistance. However, as the wear severity increases, the steel designed for ground-engaging tools (steel A) exhibits moderate improvements in gouging More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Strength-hardness correlation for carbon and low-alloy steels. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 25 Plot of hardness across the carburized layer of a gear tooth made by using a micro-indentation hardness tester with a Vickers indenter. The equivalent Rockwell C hardness is shown on the right. The effective depth of hardness is indicated by the broken line cutting the hardness plot More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 27 Schematic presentation of different methods of hardness-depth profiling. (a) Load variation method (LVM). (b) Constant load method (CLM). (c) Cross-sectional method (CSM). The cross-hatched areas indicate the relative dimensions of the probed volumes, for which a hemispherical shape More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Effect of heat treatment temperature on (a) hardness (HRC) and (b) XRD peak integral breadth. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 5 Hardness curve for wall in cylindrical and flattened region. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 The distance hardness is depicted for Grade 4130 steel at maximum, midrange, and minimum composition levels. This comparison is for Grain Size 7 only. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 3 The distance hardness and approximate tensile strength equivalents that can result from composition and grain size extremes More