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glass-transition temperature

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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 18 Relationships among glass transition temperature ( T g ), melt temperature ( T m ), molecular weight, and polymer properties. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 19 Variation of glass transition temperature ( T g ) with cure time and temperature. Source: Ref 25 More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 14 Glass transition temperature ( T g )-ln(time) curves for the same epoxy-amine system shown in Fig. 12 and 13 . DGEBA, diglycidylether of bisphenol A; PACM, 4,4’-diaminodicyclohexyl methane. Source: Ref 26 More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 16 Superposition of the glass transition temperature ( T g ) versus ln(time) data from Fig. 14 to form a master curve at a reference temperature of 140 °C (285 °F). The vitrification temperatures are indicated on the master curve: ⊡, 100 °C (212 °F); ◆, 120 °C (250 °F) ◘ 140 °C (285 °F More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 17 Relationship for glass transition temperature ( T g ) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) fractional conversion for the same epoxy-amine system shown in Fig. 13 , 14 , and 16 . Different symbols represent material cured at different temperatures: ■, 100.5 °C (212.9 °F More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 4 Glass transition temperature ( T g ) curves for semicrystalline and amorphic polymers More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 5 Glass transition temperature as a function of moisture content for F922 epoxy immersed in deionized water at three different temperatures More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 9 Conversion-time curves at cure temperatures below the glass transition temperature for full cure ( T g∞ ), showing the transition from chemical control to diffusion control upon vitrification. T g∞ ~ 120 °C (250 °F). Source: Ref 23 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006923
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
..., and glass transition temperature. It also provides information on polyimide and bismaleimide resin systems. Representative examples of different types of engineering thermoplastics are discussed primarily in terms of structure and thermal properties. chemical composition elastomeric materials...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006922
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
.... This article reviews the numerous considerations that are equally important to help ensure that part failure does not occur. It provides a quick review of thermoplastic and thermoset plastics. The article focuses primarily on thermoset materials that at room temperature are below their glass transition...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006929
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... materials and resins. It explains how absorbed moisture affects a wide range of properties, including glass transition temperature, flexural and shear modulus,creep, stress relaxation, swelling, tensile and yield strength, and fatigue cracking. It provides relevant data on common polymers, resins, and fiber...
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 4 Schematic stress-strain curves for a typical thermoplastic polymer tested at four temperatures and constant strain-rate; (1) low temperature and brittle behavior, (2) intermediate temperature with some ductility, (3) greater temperature (approaching glass transition temperature More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 4 Modulus versus temperature for typical linear semi-crystalline and amorphous polymers. T g , glass transition temperature; T m , melting temperature; 1, glassy behavior; 2, glass transition; 3, rubbery behavior; 4, viscous fluid behavior More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 4 Temperature versus modulus for different material types. T g , glass transition temperature; T m , melting temperature More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 15 Schematic of time-temperature superposition to create a master curve for cure. T g , glass transition temperature; T , temperature; a T , shift factor More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 20 Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of nylon gears. MW, molecular weight; T g , glass transition temperature; T m , melt temperature More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 1 Variation of elastic modulus with the temperature for a typical amorphous polymer. T g is the glass-transition temperature, and the horizontal dashed line shows the effect of slight cross-linking. More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 1 Residual stress distributions for various values of the Biot number, m , for the case that the initial temperature, T 0 , lies far above the glass transition temperature, T g . T ∝ , final temperature below T g ; L , sample thickness. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 13 Mer chemical structure of representative hydrocarbon thermoplastic polymers. (See Table 6 for glass transition temperatures.) More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 7 A 1000 h creep modulus of several polymers as a function of temperature. HDPE, high-density polyethylene; PBT, polybutylene terephthalate; PC, polycarbonate; PP, polypropylene; PPO, polyphenylene oxide; PVC, polyvinyl chloride; T g , glass transition temperature More