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gear tooth

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.rail.c9001496
EISBN: 978-1-62708-231-0
... fractured areas went through the body of the gear. Wheel mileage of the assembly was 34,000 miles at the time of failure. All physical and metallurgical characteristics were well within specified standards, and both parts should have withstood normal loading conditions. The primary mode of failure was tooth...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c0048261
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
... Abstract The gear of a spiral bevel gear set broke into three pieces after about two years of service. The gear (made of 4817 steel) broke along the root of a tooth intersected by three of the six 22-mm diam holes used to mount the gear to a hub. Fatigue progression for about 6.4 mm...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 17 Spiral bevel gear tooth. Tooth-bending fatigue with origin at the apex of the drilled bolt hole, which terminated just below the root radius. 0.5× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 33 Spur-gear tooth showing combination failure modes. (a) Tooth-bending impact. (b) Tooth shear. Arrows indicate direction of applied force. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Gear-tooth section. Rolling-contact fatigue. Crack origin subsurface. Progression was parallel to surface and inward away from surface. Not etched. 60× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Gear-tooth section. Rolling-contact fatigue. Crack origin subsurface. Progression was parallel with surface, inward, and finally to the surface to form a large pit or spall. Not etched. 60× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Gear-tooth section. Rolling-contact fatigue distinguished by subsurface shear parallel to surface. Note the undisturbed black oxides at the surface, indicating no surface-material movement. Not etched. 125× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 18 Spur-gear tooth. An internal crack originating at an oxide-type inclusion below the surface at the pitchline. A pit is being formed. Nital etch. 90× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 20 Helical-gear tooth. Pitting initiated along and immediately above the pitchline. In some areas, the progression has been continuous. Actual size More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 23 Gear-tooth section. Rolling-contact fatigue. Crack origin subsurface. Progression was parallel to surface and inward away from surface. Not etched. 60× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 24 Gear-tooth section. Rolling-contact fatigue. Crack origin subsurface. Progression was parallel with surface, inward, and finally to the surface to form a large pit or spall. Not etched. 60× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 25 Gear-tooth section. Rolling-contact fatigue distinguished by subsurface shear parallel to surface. Note the undisturbed black oxides at the surface, indicating no surface-material movement. Not etched. 125× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Subsurface cracking that subsequently resulted in spalling at a gear-tooth edge. Unetched section of a carburized AMS 6260 steel gear tooth. Cracking initiated in the transition zone between the carburized case and the core. 500× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 35 Case crushing at midprofile of a spiral bevel gear tooth. Progression is from the subcase area into the core and outward to the surface. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 41 An internal rupture in a gear tooth at the case/core transition zone. The rupture does not reach the surface. This condition can be discovered by ultrasonic testing. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 42 Spiral bevel gear tooth. Internal rupture is lifting the entire top of a tooth. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 Unetched metallographic cross section through gear tooth showing subsurface fatigue crack formed by rolling contact. 132×. Source: Ref 12 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 85 Dendritic microsegregation in a fractured gear tooth. 2×. Source: Ref 30 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 25 Plot of hardness across the carburized layer of a gear tooth made by using a micro-indentation hardness tester with a Vickers indenter. The equivalent Rockwell C hardness is shown on the right. The effective depth of hardness is indicated by the broken line cutting the hardness plot More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 43 (a) A fatigue crack initiating close to the flank surface of the gear tooth. (b) Multiple cracks within the carburized surface layer of the tooth in another area More