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fracture appearance

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Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003537
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract This article provides an overview of fractography and explains how it is used in failure analysis. It reviews the basic types of fracture processes, namely, ductile, brittle, fatigue, and creep, principally in terms of fracture appearances, such as microstructure. The article also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006774
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... (ductile, brittle, fatigue, and creep) are described briefly, principally in terms of fracture appearances. A description of the surface, structure, and behavior of each fracture process is also included. The article provides a framework from which a prospective analyst can begin to study the fracture...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003539
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... is not intended to provide a comprehensive atlas of fatigue fracture appearances. While these reference texts are of immense value, the experience of the fractographer remains an important aspect of good failure analysis. Fatigue Processes Fatigue has been defined as “the process of progressive localized...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006776
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... or hundreds of cycles, the microscale fracture surface appearance or morphology may be similar to monotonic ductile overload failures (i.e., microvoid coalescence or dimpled rupture). In general, the discussion of fatigue fracture appearance in this article does not apply to very-low-cycle fatigue failures...
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 31 Microstructure and fracture appearance of type 316 stainless steel tested in creep to fracture in air at 800 °C (1470 °F) at a load of 103 MPa (15 ksi). Time to rupture: 808 h. Light micrographs (a and b) illustrate r-type cavities caused by vacancy condensation on boundaries More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 32 Microstructure and fracture appearance of type 316L stainless steel tested in creep to fracture in air at 800 °C (1470 °F), using a 53 MPa (7.7 ksi) load. Time to rupture: 839 h. The light micrograph (a) illustrates w-crack coalescence by slow shearing along grain boundaries More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 33 Microstructure and fracture appearance of type 316 stainless steel tested in creep to fracture in air at 685 °C (1265 °F) at a load of 123 MPa (17.9 ksi). Time to rupture: 710 h. The light micrograph (a) shows triple-boundary cracking with extensive bulk deformation and grain More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 34 Microstructure and fracture appearance of type 316 stainless steel tested in creep to fracture at 770 °C (1420 °F) using a 62× MPa (8.95 ksi) load. Time to rupture: 808 h. (a) Optical micrograph showing crack nucleation and growth by decohesion along the carbide/matrix interfaces More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 5 Change in fracture appearance with molybdenum content in three-point bending test specimen. The dark portion is the intergranular fracture (a) 0.01%Mo.(b) 0.21%Mo. More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 5 Typical “rock candy” fracture appearance with intergranular cracking exhibited by temper-embrittled materials. 136×. More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 1 Optical image of a typical woody fracture appearance of a resulfurized material in ductile overload on a plane parallel to the longitudinal direction More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 3 SEM fracture appearance of failed l- 1 8 -in. stud More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 4 SEM fracture appearance of failed 3 4 -in. stud More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 8 Typical macro-fracture appearance of the first broken bolt (No. 33) More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 12 Typical macro-fracture appearance of the last broken bolt (No. 5) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006775
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract This article focuses on characterizing the fracture-surface appearance at the microscale and contains some discussion on both crack nucleation and propagation mechanisms that cause the fracture appearance. It begins with a discussion on microscale models and mechanisms for deformation...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003538
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract This article provides a description of the microscale models and mechanisms for deformation and fracture. Macroscale and microscale appearances of ductile and brittle fracture are discussed for various specimen geometries and loading conditions. The article reviews the general...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003542
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... this kind of postfracture damage more obvious. Fig. 4 Both halves of a silicon nitride bar broken in bending. The tensile surfaces are in contact with each other. The fracture origin appears to be a hole (pore) in the bottom piece, but the origin is really an inclusion, as seen on the top piece...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 40 Typical fracture appearances for unnotched prismatic tension-test sections More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 41 Typical fracture appearances for edge- and side-notched rectangular tension-test sections. Note the shear lips when the fracture approaches the edge of the specimen. More