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ductile-brittle transitions

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Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003550
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
.... It illustrates how surface degradation of a plain strain tension specimen alters the ductile brittle transition in polyethylene creep rupture. The article concludes with information on the effects of temperature on polymer performance. creep rupture ductile brittle transition environmental stress...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.conag.c0045987
EISBN: 978-1-62708-221-1
... and had a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature exceeding 93 deg C (200 deg F). This transition temperature was much too high for the application. It was recommended that a modified ASTM A572, grade 42 (0.15% C max), type 1 or 2, steel be used (type 1, which contains niobium, may be needed to meet...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 8 Observed microscopic fracture mechanisms for different loading conditions and environments. DBTT is the ductile brittle transition temperature, and K ISCC is the stress corrosion threshold. K IHE is the hydrogen embrittlement threshold. Note 8(a): See Fig. 13 and discussions More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 9 Observed microscopic fracture mechanisms for different loading conditions and environments. T , temperature; ε ̇ , strain rate; DBTT, ductile-brittle transition temperature; Δ K , stress-intensity factor range; K ISCC , stress-corrosion cracking threshold; K th , threshold More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 11 Brittle fractures. (a) Fracture of mild carbon steel below the ductile/brittle transition temperature. Note the appearance of river lines on the faces of the cleavage surfaces. (b) Fracture of a soda-lime glass. Note similarity of river lines to those of (a). (c) Intergranular stress More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 12 Mixed-mode fracture in a mild carbon steel cooled just to the ductile/brittle transition More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 12 Mixed mode fracture in a mild carbon steel cooled just to the ductile/brittle transition More
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Published: 01 January 2002
rapid fracture, and it is not unusual to see increasing amounts of brittle cleavage in alloys with higher strength or in the ductile-brittle transition for a given temperature and strain rate. Courtesy of Howard Nelson ( Ref 2 ) More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 11 Brittle fractures. (a) Fracture of mild carbon steel below the ductile/brittle transition temperature. Note the appearance of river lines on the faces of the cleavage surfaces. (b) Fracture of a soda-lime glass. Note similarity of river lines to those of (a). (c) Intergranular stress More
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Published: 01 January 2002
temperature is lowered, and in the region of the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) the YS of the bcc material reaches the level of the fracture strength. An increase in strain rate raises the DBTT for the bcc material. More
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Published: 15 January 2021
more sharply than that of fcc materials when temperature is lowered; in the region of the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), the YS of the bcc material reaches the level of the fracture strength. An increase in strain rate raises the DBTT for the bcc material. More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c0046205
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
... found supports the conclusion that the shaft failed as the result of stress in the sharp fillets and rough surfaces at the root of the splines. Cold weather failure occurred sooner than in hot weather because ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the 1040 steel shaft was too high. Recommendations...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.petrol.c0065825
EISBN: 978-1-62708-228-0
... concentrated towards decreasing the Charpy ductile-to-brittle transition temperature to avoid brittle fracture. It was subsequently revealed that the absorbed energy on the upper shelf of the Charpy energy-temperature curve was critical for arresting a moving crack. Both fracture initiation and fracture...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 69 Schematic figure of the brittle-to-ductile fracture transition. The relative area on the fracture surface of the three microscale fracture mechanisms (stretch zone, dimple zone, and cleavage zone) are indicated. Source: Ref 78 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Effect of strain rate on ductile-to-brittle transition temperature in body-centered cubic metals More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 23 Effect of grain size on the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 0.11% C mild steel. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 11 Effect of strain rate on ductile-to-brittle transition temperature in body-centered cubic metals More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 19 Effect of grain size on the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of 0.11% C mild steel. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 69 Schematic of brittle-to-ductile fracture transition. The relative area on the fracture surface of the three microscale fracture mechanisms (stretch zone, or SZ, dimple zone, and cleavage zone) are indicated. Source: Ref 78 More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 9 Photomacrograph of Fragment 10 showing ductile to brittle transition More