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decomposition

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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 2 Decomposition to explosion — Ammonium nitrate decomposition and explosion in neutralizer. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 9 Perlite decomposition at temperatures below about 550 °C. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Temperature-time plot of pearlite decomposition by spheroidization and graphitization. The curve for spheroidization is for conversion of one-half of the carbon in 0.15% C steel to spheroidal carbides. The curve for graphitization is for conversion of one-half of the carbon in aluminum More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 24 Temperature-time plot of pearlite decomposition by the competing mechanisms of spheroidization and graphitization in carbon and low-alloy steels. The curve for spheroidization is for conversion of one-half of the carbon in 0.15% C steel to spheroidal carbides ( Ref 8 , 9 ). The curve More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 28 Temperature-time plot of pearlite decomposition by spheroidization and graphitization. The curve for spheroidization is for conversion of one-half of the carbon in 0.15% C steel to spheroidal carbides. The curve for graphitization is for conversion of one-half of the carbon in aluminum More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.marine.c9001003
EISBN: 978-1-62708-227-3
... flux. The embrittlement was shown to be caused by the flow of corrosion generated hydrogen which converted the cementite to methane which nucleated voids in the steel. A thermodynamic estimate indicated that a small amount of chromium would stabilize the carbides against decomposition by hydrogen...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c0049796
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... indicative of decomposition and dissolution were revealed to have occurred in regions of the pyrotechnic that had been in contact with the bridgewire and pin surfaces by examination of the titanium-potassium perchlorate (Ti-K-Cl-O4) pyrotechnic. Substantial amounts of water were revealed to be associated...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.modes.c9001674
EISBN: 978-1-62708-234-1
... that the preferential attack of the gold was due to HCN formed by decomposition of the explosive powder at high temperatures. Other associated reactions were also observed including the subsequent attack of the solder by the gold corrosion product and degradation of the plastic header. Bridgewires Detonators...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.steel.c9001714
EISBN: 978-1-62708-232-7
... ratio. Metallographic investigations revealed that the surface of the attacked pipes consisted of (Cr, Fe) carbide. The metal dusting was the result of a decomposition process (CO to CO2 + C) that deposited C on the pipe surface. Because of the high temperature, the C subsequently diffused through...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.homegoods.c0090424
EISBN: 978-1-62708-222-8
... is a common breakdown product produced during the decomposition of polycarbonate. The conclusion was that the most likely cause of the molecular degradation was improper drying and/or exposure to excessive heat during the injection molding process that in turn caused the material degradation. Brackets...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001314
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... of the horizontal axis coils. Visual examination of the inside of the tubing indicated the presence of a carbonaceous deposit resulting from decomposition of the heat-exchanging fluid. Subsequent metallographic examination and microhardness testing indicated that the steel was heated to a temperature above...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001321
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... damage was typical of alkaline corrosion and confirmed that the boiler tubes failed as a result of steam blanketing that concentrated phosphate salts. The severe alkaline conditions developed most probably because of the decomposition of trisodium phosphate, which was used as a water treatment chemical...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006866
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
.... It summarizes the main synthetic polymers that are released and available for bacterial and fungal decomposition. The article also presents a detailed discussion on the enzymes that are involved in plastic degradation, and the measurement of polymer degradation. bacterial decomposition biodegradation...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.usage.c9001584
EISBN: 978-1-62708-236-5
... and testing regarding the properties, decomposition kinetics, and explosion of ammonium nitrate. We also inspected and performed metallurgical failure analysis of various fragments of evidence from the explosion site to determine the detonation initiation location from the deformation and fracture...
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 38 According to these curves, graphitization is the usual mode of pearlite decomposition at temperatures below approximately 550 °C (1025 °F). Spheroidization can be expected to predominate at higher temperatures More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Hot-rolled 1022 steel showing severe banding. Bands of pearlite (dark) and ferrite were caused by segregation of carbon and other elements during solidification and later decomposition of austenite. Nital. 250×. Courtesy of J.R. Kilpatrick More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 3 Hot rolled 1022 steel showing severe banding. Bands of pearlite (dark) and ferrite were caused by segregation of carbon and other elements during solidification and later decomposition of austenite. Nital etch. Original magnification: 250×. Courtesy of J.R. Kilpatrick More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 8 Microstructure of a carbon steel boiler tube subjected to prolonged overheating below Ac 1 showing (a) decomposition of pearlite into ferrite and spheroidal carbides (original magnification: 400×) and (b) spheroidization of carbide and grain-boundary voids characteristic of tertiary More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001767
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... indicated absorption bands consistent with an ABS resin. However, the bracket surface material exhibited additional absorbances consistent with organic acid functionality, such as fumaric acid. Organic acid functionality is known to form upon the degradation and decomposition of polymer materials. Thus...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.usage.c0047343
EISBN: 978-1-62708-236-5
... operating temperatures exceeded those intended for this application. The presence of transformation products in the brake-rotor edge indicated that the lower critical temperature had been exceeded during operation. Critical temperature Pearlite Phase decomposition 60-40-18 UNS F32800 Thermal...