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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001807
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... Abstract Rolling contact fatigue is responsible for a large number of industrial equipment failures. It is also one of the main failure modes of components subjected to rolling contact loading such as bearings, cams, and gears. To better understand such failures, an investigation was conducted...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c0047968
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
... Abstract The radial-contact ball bearings (type 440C stainless steel and hardened) supporting a computer microdrum were removed for examination as they became noisy. Two sizes of bearings were used for the microdrum and a spring washer that applied a 50 lb axial load on the smaller bearing...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003563
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract A major cause of failure in components subjected to rolling or rolling/sliding contacts is contact fatigue. This article focuses on the rolling contact fatigue (RCF) performance and failure modes of overlay coatings such as those deposited by physical vapor deposition, chemical vapor...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003564
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract Rolling-contact fatigue (RCF) is a surface damage process due to the repeated application of stresses when the surfaces of two bodies roll on each other. This article briefly describes the various surface cracks caused by manufacturing processing faults or blunt impact loads on ceramic...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.design.c0046155
EISBN: 978-1-62708-233-4
... Abstract A structure had been undergoing fatigue testing for several months when a post-like member heat treated to a tensile strength of 1517 to 1655 MPa (220 to 240 ksi) ruptured. The fracture occurred in the fillet of the post that contacted the edge of a carry-through box bolted...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001102
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001300
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... Abstract A bull gear from a coal pulverizer at a utility failed by rolling-contact fatigue as the result of continual overloading of the gear and a nonuniform, case-hardened surface of the gear teeth. The gear consisted of an AISI 4140 Cr-Mo steel gear ring that was shrunk fit and pinned onto...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.conag.c9001500
EISBN: 978-1-62708-221-1
.... The primary failure was associated with the 4820H NiMo alloy steel pinion, and thus the gear was not examined. The mode of failure was rolling contact fatigue, and the cause of failure improper engineering design. The pattern of continual overload was restricted to a specific concentrated area situated...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.machtools.c0047964
EISBN: 978-1-62708-223-5
... of the grinding machine was reconditioned to eliminate the undulations and retained austenite was minimized by careful heat treatment. Bevel gears Cracks Gear boxes Magnetic particle testing Spalling Surface grinding 8620 UNS G86200 Rolling-contact wear The service life of a production gearbox...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006792
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract Rolling-contact fatigue (RCF) is a common failure mode in components subjected to rolling or rolling-sliding contact. This article provides a basic understanding of RCF and a broad overview of materials and manufacturing techniques commonly used in industry to improve component life...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.auto.c9001498
EISBN: 978-1-62708-218-1
....” Only the pinion head had been returned. The shaft portion had been torch-cut away. Chemical analysis along with the microstructure confirmed the specified material was SAE 43BV12 Ni-Cr-Mo alloy steel. The mode of failure was surface contact fatigue through the shear plane subsurface at the lowest point...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.med.c0048421
EISBN: 978-1-62708-226-6
...) . No morphological signs of corrosion have been observed in connection with fretting structures. This has been typically found on all contact areas of plate holes and screw heads of titanium which were investigated. Fig. 1 Wear on head of titanium screw. (a) Material transport and fretting zone. (b) Close-up...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c0047975
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
... by contact fatigue mechanism (flaking) activated by the subsurface nonmetallic inclusions. Aircraft components Bearing races Flaking Transmissions (sutomotive) Bearing steel Fatigue fracture Rolling-contact wear The pilot of an aircraft reported illumination of the transmission oil-pressure...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.bldgs.c9001653
EISBN: 978-1-62708-219-8
... of the components involved. The gate was found to be made from leaded red brass (85-5-5-5) while the spindle was made from silicon brass. The difference in alloy content of the two parts in contact in an electrolyte suggested a galvanic effect may have been operative. To determine this, the open-circuit potential...
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 3 Schematic of contact pressure distribution within the contact ellipse. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Interfacial wear processes. (a) Initial contact of the two surfaces. (b) Running-in process where the soft polymer molecules are gradually transferred to the hard counterface as third-body. (c) Steady-state wear process where the wear and friction phenomena are influenced mainly More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Weld spots on contact surfaces of a type 440C stainless steel ball bearing. The spots are caused by static electrical discharges resulting from use of an electrically nonconductive grease. (a) and (b) Photographs of inner-raceway surface. 10 and 100×, respectively. (c) and (d) SEM More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 8 Tooth contact lines on a spur gear (a), a bevel gear (b), and a low-angle helical gear (c). More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 9 Lines of contact on a stepped spur gear. The heavy line on a tooth face of each gear section represents the instantaneous line of contact for that section. This offset-contact pattern is typical for helical, spiral bevel, and hypoid gears. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 22 Spiral bevel tooth. Pitting at the lowest point of single-tooth contact illustrating contact path of the tip of the mating tooth. Nital etch. 90× More