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cleavage

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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 2 The cleavage and quasi-cleavage fracture surface at the location of crack initiation. (×300) More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 A cleavage fracture in a carbon steel component is shown. Scanning electron micrograph. 593× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Transgranular cleavage in an area of the surface of the hydrogen embrittlement fracture of the type 431 stainless steel mushroom-head closure shown in Fig. 4 . See also Fig. 6 . When viewed in three-dimension, this stereo pair shows a massive ridge running from top to bottom More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Illustration of a cleavage fracture in a quenched and tempered low-carbon steel examined using three direct methods and three replication methods. (a) LM cross section (nickel plated). Etched with Vilella's reagent. (b) LM fractrograph (direct). (c) SEM fractograph (direct). (d) LM More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 River lines on a cleavage fracture surface. Direction of growth is parallel to the direction of crack coalescence as indicated by the arrow. Cracks must reinitiate at a boundary containing a twist (mode III) deformation component. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 27 Likelihood of twinning and cleavage for the three common lattices (fcc, bcc, and hcp). An increase in strain rate or a decrease in temperature increases the likelihood of twinning. The fcc metals twin only with difficulty and generally do not fracture by cleavage. See text More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Mechanical twins likely nucleated by cleavage crack propagation in a Fe-Cr-Mo alloy. Specimen taken from high strain rate, expanded tubing. Nomarski contrast illumination. Source: Ref 44 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 31 Fans. (a) Examples of fans in a two-stage TEM replica of a cleavage fracture surface of iron. The river lines point back to the crack initiation site. (b) Fans on SEM image. Source: Ref 44 , 46 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 33 Cleavage fracture in a soda lime glass. Crack progresses from left to right. (a) Fracture surface shows the initiation region (featureless mirror region), mist surrounding the mirror region and hackle. (b) Geometry of tensile test showing position of fracture surface normal to tensile More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 34 Microscale quasi-cleavage fracture in an O1 tool steel tested at room temperature. Predominantly cleavage cracking with patches and ribbons of microvoid coalescence. Source: Ref 35 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 45 Second-phase cleavage fracture in Ti-6Al-4V. (a) Light micrograph of polished and etched surface. (b) SEM of fracture surface. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 47 Cyclic cleavage observations in Fe-4Ni (at.%) at 233 K, Δ K = 17 MPa m (15.5 ksi in. ). (a) Jogs formed during cyclic stepping across grain. (b) Large number of cleavage rivers formed to accommodate the twist angle misorientation between two grains. (c) Cleavage More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 48 Scanning electron micrographs of cyclic cleavage of Fe-4Si (at.%) at 233 K, Δ K = 18.4 MPa m (16.7 ksi in. ). (a) Overload cleavage appearance at 75×. (b) Magnifications at 750× shows brittle striations on large cleavage river More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 3 Dislocation models for cleavage fracture. (a) Elastic crack regarded as a pileup of edge dislocations. (b) Pileup against a boundary forming a crack. (c) Crack forming by movement of dislocations on two slip planes. (d) Crack formation at tilt boundary. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 57 Quasi-cleavage fracture in a low-carbon steel tested at −196 °C (−320 °F). (a) Tensile specimen. (b) Torsion (mode III) specimen. Etch pitting indicated that the fracture plane was {100}. Source: Ref 72 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 64 Quasi-cleavage fracture in an O1 tool steel. Source: Ref 75 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 45 Isolated cleavage facet within progressive high-growth-rate fatigue fracture of fully pearlitic steel, as viewed in the SEM More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 3 Cleavage of a pearlite grain. 1250 × More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 5 Cleavage of a pearlite grain. Carbon replica. 10 000 × More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 6 Brittle cleavage fracture surface on a notched bar impact test specimen from the broken eyebolt. Scanning electron micrograph. 500 × More