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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c0047745
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... withstood a 1035-kPa (150-psi) pressure test using tap water. All surfaces were to have been passivated according to MIL-S-5002 before assembly, but no other cleaning techniques were stipulated. Investigation The failed braze had joined a convolute bellows to a cup on the end of a tube elbow ( Fig...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c0047956
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... prior to which the bearings were ultrasonically cleaned in trichloroethylene to ensure extreme cleanness. Equally spaced indentations resembling true brinelling were revealed by careful examination of the bearing raceways. It was concluded that the ultrasonic energy transmitted to the balls brinelled...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c0091318
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... the specified procedure for chemical cleaning of the tanks in preparation for potable water storage. The sodium hypochlorite sterilizing solution used was three times the prescribed strength, and the process exposed the bottom of the tanks to hypochlorite solution that had collected near the outlet...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001841
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... Abstract Ultrasonic cleaning is widely used in the production of medical devices such as guide wires and vascular implants. There are many cases, however, where cleaning frequencies have been close to the natural frequency of the device, producing resonant vibrations large enough to cause...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 6 Steel wire rope, used on a cleaning-line crane, that failed from fatigue resulting from vibration caused by shock loading. (a) Section of the wire rope adjacent to the fracture. Approximately 1 1 2 ×. (b) Unetched longitudinal section of a wire from the rope showing fatigue More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 2 Part of the cracked zone after cleaning. 10 × More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 13 Fracture surface (after cleaning) in origin area indicated in Fig. 12 . Arrow “a” indicates the subsurface nucleus and arrows “b” and “c” indicate crack-front markings. ×5. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Steel wire rope, used on a cleaning-line crane, that failed from fatigue resulting from vibration caused by shock loading. (a) Section of the wire rope adjacent to the fracture. Approximately 1 1 2 ×. (b) Unetched longitudinal section of a wire from the rope showing fatigue More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 5 Heat affected zone of seam weld after brush cleaning (original magnification was 8×) More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 2 (a) Before and (b) after cleaning with acetone pressure-sensitive film to remove corrosion products More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 15 Macroscopic view of failed valve after dismantling and partial cleaning, showing fracture through the outside wall of the housing near the crimped end More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 6 Part 3 after cleaning, showing cracks in greater detail. ∼0.94×. More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 4 Detailed optical photograph of the failed spot weld sample after cleaning, showing the extent of cracking on the outside surface. Arrow A shows the location of the radial crack, and arrows B and C show the left and right ends of the crack, respectively. More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 4 Mating shaft fracture surfaces after ultrasonic cleaning. Arrows denote initiation location. More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 5 SEM micrograph showing region of fast fracture before cleaning More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 6 SEM micrograph showing region of fast fracture after cleaning with orthophosphoric acid More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 4 SEM micrographs of the fracture surface after cleaning. (a) and (b) Views at increasing magnification of the crack origin area of sample A (c) Transition in fracture morphology between the intergranular fracture of the origin area (bottom) and the fatigue zone (top) More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 5 SEM micrographs of the machined cylindrical surface after cleaning. (a) Sample B: overview of the fracture surface (FS) intersecting the machined surface, showing localized pitting. (b) Sample A: overview of the machined surface, showing pitting, intergranular attack, and secondary More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 6 Fracture origin (top left corner) and fatigue region after cleaning in inhibited acid More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 2 Fracture surface shwon in Fig. 1 after cleaning. Fracture initiated in the flange and propagated across the rim, plate, and hub. More