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boring

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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 4 Interior view of the cross-boring in Fig. 3 . 1 × More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 7 Structure at the edge of the longitudinal boring in Fig. 5 , showing hydrogen attack. Etch: picral. 100 × More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 8 Structure at the edge of the longitudinal boring in Fig. 5 , showing hydrogen attack. Etch: picral. 500 × More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 9 Showing smeared material at bore of drilled hole. (×100). More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 10 “Crack-line” defect at bore of drilled hole. (×100). More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 28 Corrosion fatigue cracking on bore of copper tube. (× 7). More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 5 Cracking from laps and folds on bore of rivet holes. (×400). More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 6 Cracking from laps and folds on bore of rivet holes. (×400). More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 7 Cracking from undulations of bore surface. (×400). More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 8 Cracking from undulations of bore surface. (×400). More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 2 Macro section showing cracking from bore surface. (×5) More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 8 View looking down the bore of bearing showing arrangement of hard rubber liner within metal bearing shell More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 3 Sub-surface discontinuous hairline cracks close to the bore surface, (as polished) at ×50 More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 4 Bore fragment surface showing markings from shell on flattened lands and grooves. “Break” in the transverse markings (from tool marks on shell) is possibly caused by cracking of the projectile along this line, or by interaction of two shock fronts moving from the lands on either side. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 27 Erosion damage from the bore to just below the outside-diameter surface of an AISI H13 nozzle from a zinc die casting die. Actual size More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 28 Erosion damage and misaligned bore of the AISI H13 tool steel zinc die casting nozzle shown in Fig. 27 after longitudinal splitting. Actual size More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 50 (a) Erosion damage from the bore to just below the outside-diameter surface of an AISI H13 nozzle from a zinc die-casting die. Actual size. (b) Erosion damage and misaligned bore of the nozzle after longitudinal splitting. Actual size More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 5 Light micrograph of tail rotor blade shank bore surface. Patterns remaining on surface were result of electrolytic attack produced by lead wool adjacent to aluminum spar in presence of an electrolyte. Black material was found to be corrosion/reaction product filling spherical pits More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 6 Scanning electron micrograph of tail rotor blade bore surface after cleaning. Area shown is identical to that shown in Fig. 5 . Removal of corrosion/reaction product revealed spherical pits and etched patterns beneath the black material. Approximately 13×. More
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 8 Intergranular cracking and dezincification in the inner bore surface of the pressure relief part of the second valve. Unetched. 315× More