1-20 of 40 Search Results for

body-centered cubic

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001033
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... found in the engine was identified as type 304 stainless steel by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction of both as-received and engine run screen materials revealed that two phases were present in each: face-centered cubic (fcc) ( a = 0.3607 nm) and body-centered cubic (bcc...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.9781627081801
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006786
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
..., a supposed nonembrittler may cause a failure. Fig. 1 Embrittlement and nonembrittlement couples in solid/liquid systems. hcp, hexagonal close-packed; bcc, body-centered cubic; fcc, face-centered cubic. Source: Ref 5 Metals that have been shown to cause liquid-metal-induced embrittlement, solid...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.chem.c9001718
EISBN: 978-1-62708-220-4
... undergoes an allotropic transformation at approximately 870°C (1600°F) from a body-centered cubic crystal structure (β phase) stable at high temperatures to a heaxagonal close-packed crystal structure (α phase) stable at low temperatures. This transformation generally results in a Widmanstätten structure...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003543
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... atoms typically result in a crystalline structure, which in most engineering metals are face-centered cubic (fcc), body centered cubic (bcc), or hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structures. The formation of crystal lattices occurs as a result of bonding between atoms. Strong bonding forces between atoms...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006778
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... are rotated with respect to each other (polycrystalline). In most metals, metallic bonds between atoms typically result in a crystalline structure, which in most engineering metals are face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), or hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structures. The formation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006774
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
...% strain is insufficient to show grain elongation in (b). The other three observations are more sensitive. Courtesy of E.E. Stansbury Fig. 21 Schematic of variation in yield strength (YS) and fracture strength (FS) with temperature for face-centered cubic (fcc) and body-centered cubic (bcc...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.power.c9001609
EISBN: 978-1-62708-229-7
... Toughness is also reduced by carbide precipitation. Between 370 and 480 °C (700 and 900 °F), precipitation of alpha prime, a body-centered cubic (bcc), Cr-rich phase, also occurs and reduces overall toughness. The time required for precipitation of alpha prime is much longer than the time required...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c9001685
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... strength 1500 MPa Yield strength 965 MPa Total elongation 18% Fracture toughness (K IC ) 50 MPa × m 3 2 Hardness (1000-g load) 420 dph Density 18.5 g/cc During the quenching operation, the material is quenched from a body centered cubic crystallographic...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003573
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... by yield strength. Fig. 5 Diagram of the temperature dependence of elastic, plastic, and fracture behavior of polycrystalline materials that do not exhibit a solid-state transformation. bcc, body-centered cubic; fcc, face-centered cubic; T , instantaneous absolute temperature; T M , absolute...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006797
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... a solid-state transformation. bcc, body-centered cubic; fcc, face-centered cubic; T , instantaneous absolute temperature; T M , absolute melting temperature of the material Fig. 3 Aluminum alloy 6063-T6 extension-ladder side-rail extrusion that failed by plastic deformation and subsequent...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003554
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... of the particular structural metal and embrittler but is usually intergranular, especially for body-centered cubic and face-centered cubic alloys. Secondary cracks and crack branching are often observed, and, in LMIE, these cracks and branches are filled to the tip with resolidified embrittler metal. Liquid metal...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006775
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... the requirements for ductile and brittle crack propagation are not very different, specimen geometry, imperfection geometry, loading rate, and temperature can cause different microscale events to occur that alter the macroscale appearance. This is especially true in the body-centered cubic (bcc) materials...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006777
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... been noted to occur in some advanced high-strength steels ( Ref 33 ). A very small amount of hydrogen, often a few parts per million, can cause hydrogen embrittlement. As noted, hydrogen may promote cleavage fracture in some steels. The body-centered cubic metals are especially susceptible to hydrogen...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001822
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., as in the case of face-centered cubic (fcc) metals, the crack will propagate only when the liquid metal feeds the crack. In a notch-sensitive metal—for example, in a body-centered cubic (bcc) metal, such as iron—the nucleated crack may become unstable and propagate ahead of the liquid metal. In cases of LME...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003569
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... mechanisms of cavitation failure are considered: those for ductile materials and those for brittle materials. Ductile Failure Mechanism Ductile failure mechanism is observed for most engineering metallic materials that are not very sensitive to strain rate ( Fig. 2 ). Metals with a face-centered cubic...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003524
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... a slant (shear) fracture at about 45°. This 45° slant fracture is often called a “shear lip.” Many fractures are flat at the center, but surrounded by a “picture frame” of slant fracture. An example of this behavior is to be found in the familiar cup-and-cone fracture of a round tensile test bar...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001843
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... three crystalline forms: Grey (alpha) tin—cubic crystal structure and is a semiconductor White (beta) tin—body centered tetragonal structure and in the form of metallic tin. Rhombic (gamma) tin—also metallic. Tin is stable in its grey (alpha) semi-conductor form at temperatures below...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003538
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... are not very different, specimen geometry, imperfection geometry, loading rate, and temperature can cause different micro-scale events to occur that alter the macroscale appearance. This is especially true in the body-centered cubic (bcc) materials (and perhaps some hcp materials), which show a strong...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003545
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
...) may deform by creep at or a little above room temperature. In contrast, refractory body-centered cubic metals (such as tungsten and molybdenum) and nickel-base superalloys require temperatures near 1000 °C (1830 °F) to activate the onset of creep-deformation engineering significance. Typical materials...