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aluminum filler metals

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c0048095
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
...Abstract Abstract The T-section cross member of the lifting sling failed in service while lifting a 966 kg (2130 lb) load. The L-section sling body and the cross member were made of aluminum alloy 5083 or 5086 and were joined by welding using aluminum alloy 4043 filler metal. The fracture...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001829
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... recrystallized grains at bond coat. The composition differences between base and filler metal for welding have an effect on the extent of degradation such as aluminum depletion and crack density. ...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001339
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... plant shutdown. However, this effort was not successful, and a leak was detected in the piping within 12 h after the piping exceeded the −40 °C (−40 °F) temperature. Aluminum alloy 5083-O was the specified seamless pipe composition, and the weld filler metal was 5183. The ASTM designation...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c9001595
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... #4 - Weld Filler Metal Cracking Other Heating Event Failures Summary Selected References Selected References • Failures Related to Welding , Failure Analysis and Prevention , Vol 11 , ASM Handbook , ASM International , 2002 , p 156 – 191 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003509...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c0047636
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... was between 6 months and 1 year. Two subassemblies were returned to the laboratory for determination of cause of failure. In one ( Fig. 1a ), the threaded boss had separated from the elbow at the weld made with the gas tungsten arc process using aluminum alloy 4043 filler metal. In the second, the failure...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003509
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Lack of inspection during fabrication and variability in fabrication practice Operation of equipment/component beyond design specification Poor workmanship and improper selection of welding procedures and filler-metal composition account for numerous arc-weld failures. Other reasons...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003572
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... a smooth metal. Increase in load and speed results in higher wear of FRP through different mechanisms. High load results in more fiber cracking and pulverization leading to deterioration in load carrying capacity, while high speed accelerates the debonding of fibers/fillers. This results in easy peeling...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006782
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
..., together with other desirable characteristics. The metallic substrates are primarily steel, cast iron, and aluminum. These coatings are matured at 425 °C (800 °F). The porcelain coatings offer barrier protection to the substrate, which must be free of defects. Common applications of porcelain enamels...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001811
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
...Abstract Abstract This article focuses on the mechanisms and common causes of failure of metal components in lifting equipment in the following three categories: cranes and bridges, particularly those for outdoor and other low-temperature service; attachments used for direct lifting...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001329
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) has termed the dealloying phenomenon associated with aluminum-copper alloy systems as “dealuminization.” NACE further emphasizes that although color changes may be associated with dealloying, no cracks, pits, dimensional changes, grooving, or obvious metal loss...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006765
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
...). Fig. 5 Light micrograph showing a very large shrinkage gap between the phenolic resin mount (PM) and a specimen of 6061-T6 aluminum etched with aqueous 0.5% hydrofluoric acid. Note the metal flow at the specimen edge (revealed using Nomarski differential interference contrast illumination...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003554
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... nominal pipe size (NPS) 10, Schedule 80, 6061 aluminum alloy pipe. This pipe was the first one that the gas passed through, which operated at a temperature below the melting point of mercury. The pipe had been girth welded with 5356 filler metal using backing strips, and the leak occurred through one...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001818
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
...% (estimated) were removed and replaced with nipples fabricated from 1035 steel. Although 4140 steel is a weldable alloy steel, welding procedures suitable for 1035 steel were not appropriate for the higher-alloy material. Specification of the filler metal used for welding components of pressure-piping...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003548
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... be avoided, and insulating washers and spaces should be used to completely isolate the fastener. (b) Weld filler metals should be more noble than base metals. Transition joints can be used when a galvanic couple is anticipated at the design stage, and weld beads should be properly oriented to minimize...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006786
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... in an aluminum alloy piping elbow in a cryogenic unit at an ethylene plant ( Fig. 2 ) ( Ref 7 , 8 ). In this case, the mercury was received in shipments of feedstock that contain up to 40 ppb of mercury. The failure occurred in the girth welds at an elbow; these welds had been made using 5183 filler metal...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.modes.c9001674
EISBN: 978-1-62708-234-1
... header for the detonator assembly is diallyl phthalate (DAP) which also contains glass fibers and clay as fillers and various dyes for component identification. The 38 µm (0.0015 in.) bridgewire is pure gold which is soldered to phosphor bronze electrodes using a 37.5 wt % Pb, 37.5 wt % Sn, and 25 wt...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006783
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... be used to completely isolate the fastener. (b) Weld filler metals should be more noble than base metals. Transition joints can be used when a galvanic couple is anticipated at the design stage, and weld beads should be properly oriented to minimize galvanic effects. (c) Local damage can result from cuts...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006778
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... ( Fig. 1a , b ). Parabolic or elongated shear dimples occur from torsional loading ( Fig. 1c ) or from mode II (in-plane) shear. However, metallic materials can behave in a ductile manner but not exhibit the classical dimple-rupture morphology, as shown in Fig. 1(d) for a cast aluminum alloy...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003532
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... caused ferrite and pearlite to form, and this area is slightly out of focus. Specimen etched with nital Fig. 13 Light micrograph showing a very large shrinkage gap between the phenolic resin mount (PM) and a specimen of 6061-T6 aluminum etched with aqueous 0.5% hydrofluoric acid. Note the metal...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001041
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
..., as detailed in Fig. 5 . Welding was performed with the gas metal arc process using 1.1 mm (0.045in.) diam AWS A5.18 ER70S-6 filler metal and a 75% argon/25% CO 2 shielding gas. The welding procedure was governed by an in-house specification based on AWS D14.3, “Specification for Welding Earthmoving...