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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c9001260
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... Abstract One percent Cr-Mo low alloy constructional steel is widely used for high tensile applications, e.g., for manufacture of high tensile fasteners, heat treated shafts and axles, for automobile applications such as track pins for high duty tracked vehicles etc. The steel is fairly through...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Strength-hardness correlation for carbon and low-alloy steels. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 A constant-life diagram for alloy steels that provides combined axes for more ready interpretation. Note the presence of safe-life, finite-life lines on this plot. This diagram is for average test data for axial loading of polished specimens of AISI 4340 steel (ultimate tensile strength More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Correlation between hardness and Larson-Miller parameter for alloy steels 1Cr- 1 2 Mo, 2Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1Mo More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001093
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
...-plated AISI 8740 steel bolt broke through the head-to-shank fillet while being handled during assembly. Pertinent Specifications Dimensions of the alloy steel bolt (MSD 21250-10070) were 15.9 mm (0.625 in.) diam, 111 mm (4.375 in.) grip length, and 134.5 mm (5.294 in.) overall length. It was heat...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c0048634
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
...-plated AISI 8740 alloy steel fasteners that failed by hydrogen embrittlement. See also Fig. 2 . Fig. 2 Scanning electron micrograph of fracture surface of fasteners shown in Fig. 1 . 880× Mechanical Testing To simulate installation conditions, fasteners from several lots were...
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Cadmium-plated AISI 8740 alloy steel fasteners that failed by hydrogen embrittlement. See also Fig. 2 . More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 4 Sand-cast low-alloy steel eye connector from a floating-bridge pontoon that broke under static tensile loading. (a) Schematic illustration of pontoon bridge and enlarged view of eye and clevis connectors showing location of fracture in eye connector. (b) A fracture surface of the eye More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 20 Highway-truck equalizer beam, sand cast from low-alloy steel, that fractured because of mechanical cracking. (a) Fracture surface; detail A shows increments (regions B, C, D, and E) in which crack propagation occurred sequentially. Dimensions given in inches. (b) Micrograph More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 45 Low-alloy steel conveyor pipe that cracked at fillet welds securing a carbon steel flange because of poor fit-up. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 51 Nonmetallic inclusions and banding in a microsegrated 1% C alloy steel showing retained austenite. Source: Ref 30 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 16 Mechanical properties of quenched and tempered low-alloy steel (0.30–0.50 wt% C) as determined by Patton. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 17 Mechanical properties of quenched and tempered low-alloy steel (0.30–0.45 wt% C) as determined by Janitsky and Baeyertz. Source: Ref 12 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Comparison of wear surfaces for low-alloy steel specimens worn in (a) flow-through and (b) recycled slurry tests for 1 h and 1.67 h, respectively. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 Low-alloy steel roller bearing from an improperly grounded electric motor that was pitted and etched by electrolytic action of stray electric currents in the presence of moisture. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 13 Cadmium-plated alloy steel self-retaining bolts that fractured because of hydrogen damage. (a) Fractured and unused intact bolt. (b) Fractured bolt; brittle fracture surface is indicated by A and B. (c) and (d) Electron fractographs of surfaces A and B, respectively, showing brittle More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 14 Cadmium-plated AISI 8740 alloy steel fasteners that failed by hydrogen embrittlement. See also Fig. 15 . More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 27(a) AISI 4150 alloy steel chuck jaw that broke because of the presence of a brittle white-etching nitride surface layer. The part was hardened and tempered before nitriding. A micrograph of a broken tooth (arrows) of this chuck jaw is shown in Fig. 27(b) . More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 Large circular spall on forged, hardened alloy steel mill roll. Faint white arrow marks location of subsurface fatigue origin. Beach marks are evident within the fatigue propagation zone, which is surrounded by fast brittle fracture. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 14 Fatigue failure of a low-alloy steel part. Shear lips around most of the periphery (as at arrows) as well as chevron marks over most of the fracture surface aid in identifying the fatigue fracture area at the lower left corner. Source: Ref 15 More