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Sulfur compounds

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c0047912
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
... the buildup of sulfur compounds or bearing halves that have corrosion-resistant overlay materials were recommended as best solutions. Connecting rods Gasoline engines Lubrication oils Sulfuric acid SAE 485 Pitting corrosion A connecting-rod shell bearing from a six-cylinder gasoline engine...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.auto.c9001182
EISBN: 978-1-62708-218-1
... was welded on to the valve seat. Fracture was a consequence of fatigue corrosion cracking, itself strongly promoted by the presence of sulphur compounds. The origin of these corrosive sulphur compounds could not be explained. Automotive components Exhaust valves Sulfur compounds Valve steel...
Image
Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 6 An area of extreme electrical attack at the edge of an individual pad. “A” marks an oil groove that is partially filled with relocated silver/silver-sulfur compound. “B” is the site of buildup of silver-sulfur compound. This area was cross sectioned for metallographic study (see Fig. 7 More
Image
Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 7 Cross section from area “B” in Fig. 3 . Arrow points to deposit of silver-sulfur compound. Unetched. 39×. More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001076
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... pad. “A” marks an oil groove that is partially filled with relocated silver/silver-sulfur compound. “B” is the site of buildup of silver-sulfur compound. This area was cross sectioned for metallographic study (see Fig. 7 ). 3.7×. Fig. 7 Cross section from area “B” in Fig. 3 . Arrow points...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.petrol.c9001638
EISBN: 978-1-62708-228-0
... or segregate at surfaces or interfaces, and in this instance, the absorption of sulfur on the tube surfaces is established by the equilibrium: H 2 S = H + S ads Although injecting sulfur compounds such as H 2 S into the process stream (typical concentrations are 50 to 100 ppm...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001318
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... with oxygen, trace quantities of mercury were found on one fracture surface. Discussion Since initial analyses on the disc samples revealed no indications of mercury, stress-corrosion cracking by ammonia, nitrogen compounds or sulfur compounds was at first thought to have caused premature failure...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001320
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... that the pitting was promoted by underdeposit chloride attack. Fig. 5 EDS results from a pit deposit Discussion The pitting found on the internal surface of this tube sample results from underdeposit acidic attack, promoted by the presence of chlorine. Certain sulfur compounds can add to pit...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001083
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... further indicates that poor riser design was responsible. According to the Copper Development Association, the higher than specified phosphorus content would not have caused excessive shrinkage voids. Many of the voids, which acted as concentration sites, were filled with sulfur compounds that were...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001049
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... oxides were prevalent in the center of the corroded area. The exact corrosion mechanism was unclear, other than the observation that aggressive sulfur compounds appeared to be active. It should be noted that the enviromnental chemistry in shielded areas (crevices) such as hot cracks can...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003555
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
.... Creep cavities along grain boundaries link up and lead to preferential cracking. Both micrographs show an area approximately 0.38 mm (0.015 in.) wide. Source Ref 19 Sulfidation Sulfidation is a reaction of a metal or alloy with a sulfur-containing species to produce a sulfur compound...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c9001629
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... and oxygen, indicative of organic compounds. Coolant 1 was found to contain small amounts of sulfur and phosphorus along with carbon and oxygen. Coolant 2 contained relatively small levels of aluminum, sodium, sulfur, phosphorus, and chlorine, along with high carbon and oxygen. The detergent was primarily...
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 8 Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXA) spectrum indicating the cadmium plating and the presence of sulfur-based thread compound More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006920
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
...-molecular-weight HALS are washed out faster by water. High-molecular-weight HALS are less flexible but offer better long-term protection. Often a mixture of both low- and high-molecular-weight HALS is used for the best effect. The HALS may become irreversibly deactivated by acids or by sulfur compounds...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001816
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006825
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... The scale on the internal surface of carbon and low-alloy steel tubes such as T11 and T22 steels consists of FeO (wustite), Fe 2 O 3 (hematite), and Fe 3 O 4 (magnetite). In the presence of moisture or water in the form of condensate, there can also be formation of the compound Fe(OH) 2 (ferrous...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.steel.c0091757
EISBN: 978-1-62708-232-7
... to 69 kPa (5 to 10 psi), and 125 deg C (260 deg F). The kiln developed perforations within eight months of operation. Investigation (visual inspection, metallurgical analysis, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and 44X micrographs) supported the conclusion that the sulfur and chlorine in the charcoal...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001809
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... of a section through a copper-lead alloy bearing that failed by deleading. Light area at the upper surface is the copper matrix that remained after the alloy was depleted of lead. As-polished. 100× Example 1: Corrosion of Copper-Lead Alloy Sliding Bearings by Sulfur Compounds A connecting-rod shell...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001827
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... by fuel and/or ash compounds of Na, V, S, and Cl. Vanadium and sulfur are present in the coal or fuel oil burned in different applications. In some situations, these impurities may be ingested from the service environment, for instance, in the case of NaCl contamination from marine atmospheres...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.power.c9001616
EISBN: 978-1-62708-229-7
.... The corrosion product consisted of various elements such as silicon, sulfur, potassium, chlorine, and calcium. Figure 10 shows the areas consisting of high concentrations of silicon and chlorine, and Fig. 11 presents areas with high aluminum, sulfur, and potassium. Fig. 7 Stereomicrographs...