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Propeller blades

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c9001747
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... Abstract This report covers case histories of failures in fixed-wing light airplane and helicopter components. In a 2025-T6 or 2219 aluminum alloy propeller blade that failed near the tip, cracks started on the leading edge at surface damage in the critical area-the zone between 4 and 10...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c9001708
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... Abstract The paper describes the findings from a damaged propeller blade made from Mn-Ni-Al-bronze, commercially known as Superston 70 (ABS Type 5). The blade had broken at the 0.65 pitch radius location, and the fracture occurred in a brittle mode. The findings reported here point to two...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c0046217
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... Abstract An aluminum alloy propeller blade that had been cold straightened to correct deformation incurred in service fractured soon after being returned to service. Visual examination revealed that crack initiation occurred at the top surface in an area containing numerous surface pits...
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Aluminum alloy propeller blade that fractured in fatigue after being deformed in service and then cold straightened. (a) Fracture surface showing brittle appearance, and final-fracture areas (arrows A) at leading and trailing edges. (b) Crack-initiation region showing brittle appearance More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Propeller blade failed near the tip. Material: 2025-T6 or 2219-T6; hardness: DPH 128 to 138. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 2 Typical fatigue fracture face of a propeller blade. Note nick (or stone bruise cut) at the O (origin) on the leading edge of the blade's rear face. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 8 Face of fatigue fracture in propeller blade. Note beach and river markings pointing to origin. More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c9001903
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... Abstract Fretting and/or fretting corrosion fatigue have been observed on such parts as main rotor counterweight tie rods, fixed-pitch propeller blades, propeller blade clamps, pressure regulator lines, and landing gear support brackets. Microcracks started from severe corrosion pits...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.usage.c9001728
EISBN: 978-1-62708-236-5
... available for examination, in addition to the hub and attachment bolts, were the two propeller blades and the engine crankshaft. The purpose of this examination was to determine the nature and probable cause of failure in the six attachment bolts. Indications of fatigue failure and wear were the major...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001793
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... Abstract A controllable pitch propeller (CPP) on a dynamic positioning ship failed after eight months of operation. The CPP design consists of a hollow propeller shaft and a concentrically located pipe that operates inside. The pitch of the propeller blades is controlled hydraulically through...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001082
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... Abstract Several large-diameter type 304L stainless steel impeller/propeller blades in a circulating water pump failed after approximately 8 months of operation. The impeller was a single casting that had been modified with a fillet weld buildup at the blade root. Visual examination indicated...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c9001507
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
... investigation determined that the four-bladed propeller from the left inboard engine had separated in flight, subsequently impacting the left outboard engine, causing its propeller to separate also. Three years later, the left inboard propeller hub was recovered. All four blades had separated through the shank...
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Published: 01 December 1993
Fig. 1 PTR with three-bladed propeller rotor in wind tunnel test configuration More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001103
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... a twin-screw vessel fractured just below the bolthead. Circumstances Leading to Failure Three retaining bolts fractured on a blade of one of the variable-pitch propellers. That blade was lost after it contacted a foreign object. Inspection of a blade located on the opposite side of the vessel...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001363
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... of different rotors. The configuration for the present test is shown in Fig. 1 . The rotor was a right-hand rotation 7.5 m (25 ft) diam propeller with three blades. The purpose of the wind tunnel tests was to define the propulsive performance of the rotor. Fig. 1 PTR with three-bladed propeller rotor...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006821
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... of the right propeller. The right propeller oversped, resulting in separation of the No. 2 right propeller blade due to overstress. The blade cut into the fuselage, decreasing the structural integrity of the fuselage and resulting in breakup of the aircraft. Examination of the propeller blades showed...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003570
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., ship propellers and hydrofoils, mechanical devices with restricted fluid passages (e.g., seals and bearings), heat-exchanger tubes, and hydraulic structures such as spillways, gates, and tunnels that are associated with dams. Consequently, cavitation erosion is still a very active research topic...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001020
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
.... It was immediately evident that the right landing gear was not supporting the aircraft, because that side of the aircraft dropped to the ground, with the aircraft now supported only by the left landing gear and nosewheel. This caused the right wing tip, the propeller blades of the right engine, and the lower portion...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003568
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., as in a jet or rotary pump, vapor bubbles collapse at high-pressure areas and destroy the protective film on the metal surface or disrupt the metal itself. Cavitation erosion occurs typically on rotors or pumps, on the trailing faces of propellers and of water turbine blades, and on the water-cooled side...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003500
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., the importance of investigating failures is vividly illustrated in the pioneering efforts of the Wright Brothers in developing self-propelled flight. In fact, while Wilbur was traveling in France in 1908, Orville was conducting flight tests for the U.S. Army Signal Corps and was injured when his Wright Flyer...