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Polycarbonate

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.modes.c0090463
EISBN: 978-1-62708-234-1
... contributing factor was the design of the part, which produced significant interference stresses between the contact and a mating retaining tab. Creep strength Housings Polycarbonate Brittle fracture A housing used in conjunction with an electrical switch failed shortly after being placed...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.homegoods.c0090448
EISBN: 978-1-62708-222-8
... Abstract Housings (being tested as part of a material conversion) from an electrical appliance failed during an engineering evaluation. They had been injection molded from a commercial polycarbonate/PET blend. Parts produced from the previous material, a nylon 6/6 resin, had consistently passed...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.homegoods.c0090424
EISBN: 978-1-62708-222-8
... Abstract A plastic bracket exhibited relatively brittle material properties, which ultimately led to catastrophic failure. The part had been injection molded from a medium-viscosity polycarbonate resin and had been in service for a short duration prior to the failure. Investigation (visual...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001278
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... Abstract Metal-framed polycarbonate (PC) ophthalmic lenses shattered from acetone solvent-induced cracking. The lenses exhibited primary and secondary cracks with solvent swelling and crazing. A laboratory accident splashed acetone onto the lenses. The metal frames gripped approximately two...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 Isochronous plot of polycarbonate stress-strain behavior as a function of temperature. Note that the crazing locus decreases in strain value with increasing temperature. (a) 23 °C (73.5 °F). Relative humidity, 50%. (b) 40 °C (104 °F). (c) 80 °C (176 °F). (d) 100 °C (212 °F). Courtesy More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 Failed polycarbonate lenses exhibited primary and secondary cracking associated with solvent swelling and cracking More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 17 Shrinkage void on field fracture surface of polycarbonate. 12× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 18 Polycarbonate fracture surface showing mirror zone, mist and hackle regions, and Wallner lines. 14× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Fracture initiation region of polycarbonate specimen after Izod impact showing mirror zone and mist region. 27× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 21 Hackle region in final ligament of polycarbonate specimen after Izod impact. 14× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 24 Fatigue striations on the fracture surface of a polycarbonate plumbing fixture after field failure. 32× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Craze formation in a polycarbonate polymer in tension under alcohol. Source: Ref 37 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Low-magnification view of fracture origin area of polycarbonate impact test specimen. Curved Wallner lines, formed by interaction between the rapidly progressing crack front and dynamic stress waves, are reminiscent of beach marks but do not indicate progressive fatigue fracture More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 51 Features observed on fatigue area of polycarbonate rotating beam specimen. (a) Optical view at base of notch. (b) Higher magnification electron fractograph. Sample was sputter coated with platinum for SEM examination. More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 11 Example of melted polycarbonate light fixture shield. The material flows above approximately 155 °C (310 °F), near the upper end of heat exposure zone III. More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 29 Low-magnification view of fracture origin area of polycarbonate impact test specimen. Curved Wallner lines, formed by interaction between the rapidly progressing crack front and dynamic stress waves, are reminiscent of beach marks but do not indicate progressive fatigue fracture More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 51 Features observed on fatigue area of polycarbonate rotating-beam specimen. (a) Optical view at base of notch. (b) Higher-magnification electron fractograph. Sample was sputter coated with platinum for scanning electron microscopy examination. More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 20 Craze formation in a polycarbonate polymer in tension under alcohol. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 1 Activation spectra of 760 μm (30 mil) thick polycarbonate specimen using 6000 W xenon weatherometer with borosilicate filters plus short-wavelength cutoff filters. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 6 Stress-strain curves for rubber-modified polycarbonate at room temperature as a function of strain rate More