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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c9001244
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... Abstract The cross bars of conveyor belt links that served to transport glass containers through a stress relief furnace fractured in many cases. They consisted of wires of 5 mm diam made of low-carbon Siemens-Martin steel, while the interwoven longitudinal bars were made of strip steel of 4 x...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001126
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... Abstract The spontaneous breakage of tempered glass spandrel panels used to cover concrete wall panels on building facades was investigated. Between January 1988 and August 1990, 19 panel failures were recorded. The tinted panels were coated on their exterior surfaces with a reflective metal...
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 2 Photograph of the CIM showing no leakage following molten glass test. The original drain tube was removed and replaced with a short tube that was seal welded at the bottom. More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 6 Fracture in a glass rod demonstrates a symmetrical compression chip More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Fracture surface of a glass plate broken in bending. The fracture origin is at the top edge of the fracture surface, to the left of the center of the image. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼1 mm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 High-magnification view of the glass plate shown in Fig. 1 . There is a complex system of cracks created by mechanical contact of the glass surface with a sharp, hard object. SEM; picture width ∼100 μm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 8 Fracture surface of a glass rod broken in bending. The fracture origin is at the top center of the image. Wallner lines are seen in the fracture mirror, which is bordered by mist and velocity hackle. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼2 mm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 Fracture surface of a piece of glass broken by striking it with a hammer. Origin is at the lower left; the wavelike lines are Wallner lines. Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼3 mm. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 12 Fracture surface of a glass capillary broken in bending. Fracture propagated from top to bottom. Gull wings and wake hackle formed when the front moved around the hole of the capillary (the black circle in the picture). Optical microscope; reflected light; picture width ∼4 mm. Source More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 17 Glass plate broken in thermal shock. The fracture origin is at the lower edge of the plate. Note how the crack is normal to this edge. The “meandering” shape of the crack is typical of thermal-shock failure of plates. Camera image; picture width ∼20 mm More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 18 Vickers indentation site on a glass surface. The dark lines are radial cracks that are normal to the surface; the bright areas are subsurface lateral cracks that are nearly parallel to the surface. Optical microscope; reflected light (differential interference contrast) More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Vickers indentation origin in a glass plate. The indentation is seen in cross section at the center of the image. Two radial cracks together form a semicircular region, a so-called half-penny crack, that became the fracture origin. Optical microscope; transmitted light; picture width More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 20 Impact site on a glass surface made by a 100 μm (4 mil) particle of SiC. SEM; picture width ∼200 μm. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 21 Impact fracture origin in glass caused by impact damage from a 100 μm (4 mil) SiC particle. Specimen was tilted in the SEM to reveal original surface (left) and fracture surface (right). SEM; picture width ∼300 μm. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 22 Impact fracture origin in glass caused by impact damage from a 100 μm (4 mil) SiC particle. Specimen was tilted in the SEM. Original surface is at left, fracture surface at right. SEM; picture width ∼200 μm. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 23 Hertzian impact site in glass. Specimen was tilted in the SEM to reveal original surface (left) and fracture surface (right). SEM; picture width ∼200 μm. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 24 Hertzian fracture origin in glass. Original surface is at left, fracture surface at right. Main fracture started from base of Hertzian cone. SEM; picture width ∼300 μm. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 25 Machining flaw as fracture origin in glass. Rough surface is the bottom of a groove cut by a diamond saw. SEM; picture width ∼200 μm. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 Differential scanning calorimetry used to detect glass transitions within amorphous thermoplastic resins. The (I) indicates that the numerical temperature was determined as the inflection point on the curve. More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 6 Example window blast damage indicator. Note the blue glass on the ground from the windows, shown by arrows in pictures of the (a) near building and (b) far building. In (b), the intact side window is circled. More