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Flue gases

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.power.c9001616
EISBN: 978-1-62708-229-7
..., with a 2 mm thickness. Fig. 1 Schematic of the air preheater showing the different stages and the direction of air and flue gases (note the part of the outer shield is shown in open to reveal the pipes) The corrosion was not uniform on all the tubes and stages in the preheater. Approximately...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001826
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... Microstructural Studies The outer surface of the failed portion of the tube was exposed to the furnace fire from one side (temperature: 1250 °C) and the outgoing flue gases on the other side (temperature: 400 °C). The leakage was on the down stream side of the tube facing the furnace. The failed tube length...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.marine.c9001164
EISBN: 978-1-62708-227-3
..., the carbon acting as a cathode, and alloy susceptibility to intergranular corrosion contributed to the corrosion. Corrosion products Flue gases Sulfates Incoloy 825 UNS N08825 Intergranular corrosion Pitting corrosion The inlet foot ( Figs. 1 and 2 ) was part of a fire prevention inert gas...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001324
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... Caustic embrittlement Flue gases 430Ti Brittle fracture Stress-corrosion cracking Visual Examination of General Physical Features Testing Procedure and Results Discussion Conclusions and Recommendations Selected Reference Selected Reference • Warke W. R. , Stress-Corrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006825
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... absorption by the furnace walls reduces the temperature of the flue gases to 925 to 1095 °C (1700 to 2000 °F). The heat absorbed is converted into steam at its saturation temperature, which is a function of the operating boiler pressure. Within the convection passes, the flue gas temperature is further...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001816
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... and the heating of steam in a superheater or reheater. The heat-flow path through a clean boiler tube has three components. First, fire-side heat transfer from the flame or hot flue gases is by both radiation and convection. Radiation predominates in the furnace, where the gas temperatures may be close to 1650 °C...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001341
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
.... The three failures were located near the header ends and in the first tube row where the flue gases are hottest. The first two rows of tubes on the upstream side of the flue duct were bare 38.1-mm (1.5-in.) diameter Schedule 40 SB 407 alloy 800H pipe. The remaining rows of downstream tubes...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003568
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... of mechanical seals for abrasive service are even axially split for ease of replacement. Another example of abrasive erosion is the impact of fly ash entrained in the flue gases in screen tubes or superheater tubes of boiler systems. Erosion is enhanced by high flow velocities; thus, partial fouling of gas...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006795
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... of mechanical seals for abrasive service are even axially split for ease of replacement. Another example of abrasive erosion is the impact of fly ash entrained in the flue gases in screen tubes or superheater tubes of boiler systems ( Ref 91 ). Erosion is enhanced by high flow velocities; thus, partial...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.steel.c9001149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-232-7
..., the temperature differences and thermal bending also increased. Because of the thermal bending, saddle support holddown bolts began breaking in February. The nonuniform temperatures were caused by several factors including flue gas impingement, weather conditions, nonuniform heat convection from the outside...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006787
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Elsevier , New York , 1971 68. Cutler A.J.B. , Halstead W.D. , Laxton J.W. , and Stevens C.G. , The Role of Chloride in the Corrosion Caused by Flue Gases and Their Deposits, Trans. ASME , July 1971 , p 307 – 312 10.1115/1.3445580 69. Koripelli R.S. , Crowe...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003503
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... as an output; flue gases and heat leakage are also produced as waste outputs. The water temperature is regulated by the controller opening and closing the main gas valve (labeled stop valve) when the temperature of the water in the tank goes outside the preset limits of 60 to 82 °C (140 to 180 °F). The pilot...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003555
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., with the evolved gases likely to be neutral to acidic. Ash deposition, thermally induced stress, and particulate erosion may cause conditions that accelerate localized corrosion by cracking the protective oxide layer. Iron, nickel, and cobalt superalloys owe their unique strength, up to a fairly high threshold...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006813
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
...: Ref 7 Fig. 27 Collapsed heating elements. Source: Ref 10 Fig. 28 Thick layer of ash and flue gas species deposited on Corten heating element surface. (a–c) Underdeposit pitting after removal of the deposited layer shown in the image. Image (b) is at a higher magnification...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006810
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003548
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... preparation (mill scale, coatings surface finish, etc.), environmental composition (trace contaminants, dissolved gases, etc.), temperature, flow rate, solution concentration, and degree of agitation or aeration. In addition, corrosion product films and other changes in surface composition can also occur...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006783
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... the potential must be addressed. This includes material composition, heat treatment, surface preparation (mill scale, coatings, surface finish, etc.), environmental composition (trace contaminants, dissolved gases, etc.), temperature, flow rate, solution concentration, and degree of agitation or aeration...