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Compressive stress

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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 20 Fading of surface compressive stress induced with a number of fretting cycles by shot peening More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 28 (a) Fading of surface compressive stress induced with a number of fretting cycles by shot peening. Adapted from Ref 93 . (b) Evolution of fretting fatigue endurance (cracking failure) as a function of fatigue stress for constant partial slip fretting loading ( P = Cst, Q * = Cst More
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 10 Nominal compressive stress curves of polychlorotrifluoroethylene at various pressures. Source: Ref 58 More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 5 Compressive stress–strain response of the subject and exemplar aluminum hosels at room temperature and strain rate of 0.001/s. (We deduced that the aluminum alloy could be A360.0) More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 20 Impact crater area versus compressive residual stress for impacts normal to the lay and compressive stresses perpendicular to the grinding direction (■) and for impacts perpendicular to the lay and compressive stresses parallel to the grinding direction (●), using sintered reaction More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 18 Impact crater area vs. compressive residual stress for impacts normal to the lay and compressive stresses perpendicular to the grinding direction (○), and for impacts perpendicular to the lay and compressive stresses parallel to the grinding direction (●), using sintered reaction More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 27 Plot of the change in the compressive residual stress due to heat treatment More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 27 Plot of the change in compressive residual stress due to heat treatment More
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Published: 01 December 2019
Fig. 16 FEA relative-stress grayscale map of the component under compressive load More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... into the normally sealed bearing cap chamber surrounding the bolt shank. A complete absence of fractures in bolts from one of the two vendors was attributed primarily to surface residual compressive stresses produced on the bolt shank by a finish machining operation after heat treatment. Shot cleaning, with fine...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001119
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... Intergranular fracture Background Two samples of helical compression springs composed of chromium-silicon steel (50 to 54 HRC) failed early in service, although design and operating stresses appeared to be within the material endurance limit. Failure initiated from the spring inside coil surface; final...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.aero.c9001552
EISBN: 978-1-62708-217-4
.... Aircraft engine manufacturers and aeronautical standards require magnetic particle inspection to detect grinding cracks after reconditioning. Renitriding after any grinding is needed also, regardless of the amount of undersize as it introduces beneficial residual compressive stresses. Chromium...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c0047144
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... Abstract During autofrettage of a thick-wall steel pressure vessel, a crack developed through the wall of the component. Certain forged pressure vessels are subjected to autofrettage during their manufacture to induce residual compressive stresses at locations where fatigue cracks may initiate...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.design.c0047100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-233-4
... included increasing the radii of the notch and shaft fillets. If fatigue cracking had continued to be a problem with this component, shot peening of the subject radii would be appropriate. This process produces residual compressive stresses in the surface of the part, thereby retarding initiation...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.auto.c9001189
EISBN: 978-1-62708-218-1
... at the outer part of the teeth. The nitride layer did not stand up to the high and one-sided compressive stress applied in this case and could not prevent pitting. It could even have accelerated the wear by the incipient break down. Gas nitriding at greater depth under application of a suitable special steel...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c0048124
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... it was reoriented to the plane normal to the major tensile axis by sufficient loading. The shot-peening procedure was altered to create adequate surface compression at all stressed points on the springs. Cracks Galling Orientation Tensile stress Valve spring steel Surface treatment related failures...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 Photoelastic study of two mating pinion teeth receiving full load. Note the high concentration of compressive stress at the point of contact, the tensile stress at the root radius, and the zero-stress point at the tooth centerline below the root circle. More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.auto.c0090626
EISBN: 978-1-62708-218-1
... the compressive residual-stress levels in the springs. Recommendation was made to increase the time the spring was shot peened from 12 to 60 min. Automotive components Residual stresses Shot peening Spring steel Surface treatment related failures A steel spring used in an automotive application...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.rail.c9001465
EISBN: 978-1-62708-231-0
... that the cracking was caused by lateral deflection of the rails under in-service loads. The web of a rail would normally be loaded in compression but, should lateral movements occur, then it would be subjected to bending stresses and fatigue cracks could break out in regions where excessive tensile components...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006768
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... ), where thousands of grains are sampled in a typical measurement. When the material is in tension, the d -spacing increases in the direction of stress, and when the material is in compression, the d -spacing decreases. The presence of residual stresses in the material produces a shift in the XRD peak...