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Chain links

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c9001209
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... Abstract Three links of a chain showing unusually strong wear were examined. Corresponding to the stress, the wear was strongest in the bends of the links, but it was especially pronounced in the bend in which the butt weld seam was located. Investigation showed the links were manufactured from...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c0048052
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... Abstract Several thousands of new 16 mm diam alloy steel sling chains used for handling billets failed by chain-link fractures. No failures were found to have occurred before delivery of the new chains. It was observed that the links had broken at the weld. It was found that all failures had...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c9001262
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... Abstract A chain link which was part of the hoisting mechanism of a drop hammer broke after three or four months of service. It was reportedly manufactured of the heat resistant steel 30 Cr-Mo-V 9 (Material No. 1.7707). The fracture of the chain link had a conchoidal structure and ran along...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.conag.c0047474
EISBN: 978-1-62708-221-1
... Abstract A 10-cm (4-in.) chain link used in operating a large dragline bucket failed after several weeks in service. The link was made of cast low-alloy steel (similar to ASTM A487, class 10Q) that had been normalized, hardened, and tempered to give a yield strength of approximately 1034 MPa...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c0047432
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... Abstract The conveyor chain link failed by fracturing through a fabrication weld after some time in service. The link was made of cast low-alloy steel heat treated to a hardness of 285 HRB. The fabrication weld was made using E7018 electrodes. The fracture surfaces were almost entirely covered...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001134
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... Abstract An ASTM A391 steel chain link of an over head hoist failed catastrophically, causing damage to both property and personnel. Macrofractography identified the sequence of fractures within the chain link. The first fracture occurred at the welded joint, a second occurred opposite the weld...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c0089676
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... Abstract Chain link, a part of a mechanism for transferring hot or cold steel blooms into and out of a reheating furnace, broke after approximately four months of service. The link was cast from 2% Cr austenitic manganese steel and was subjected to repeated heating to temperatures of 455 to 595...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c0048048
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... Abstract A resistance-welded chain link made from 16 mm diam 4615 steel failed while lowering a 9070 kg load of billets into a rail car after being in service for 13 months. Beach marks, typical of fatigue were found to have originated at the inside of the link which broke at the weld. Cracks...
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Reheating-furnace chain link, sand cast from austenitic manganese steel, that failed by brittle fracture, because material was not stable at operating temperatures. (a) Chain link showing location of fracture. Dimensions given in inches. (b) Macrograph of a nital-etched specimen from More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Cast conveyor chain link that fractured through fabrication weld (bottom). Secondary fracture at upper left. See also Fig. 2 . More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 3 Macroetched cross section through fracture of conveyor chain link. Note incomplete penetration at weld root. Etched with ammonium persulfate More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Resistance-welded 4615 steel chain link that broke because of a weld defect. (a) A fracture surface of the chain link showing fatigue beach marks (arrow) progressing across the surface from the inside of the link. (b) Nital-etched longitudinal section through the link showing fracture More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Chain link with strong wear at welded end. 1 × More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 54 Reheating-furnace chain link, sand cast from austenitic manganese steel, that failed by brittle fracture, because material was not stable at operating temperatures. (a) Chain link showing location of fracture. Dimensions given in inches. (b) Macrograph of a nital-etched specimen from More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 109 Fractured undercutter chain link in the as-received condition More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 110 Multiple fatigue cracks in chain link. Arrows indicate fracture surfaces with heavy oxide More
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Published: 01 December 1992
Fig. 1 As-received chain link. 2×. More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 23 Photographs of the chain link showing wear patterns on the intrados More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 28 Photograph of broken chain link in the as-received condition More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 29 Micrograph of the overall fracture surface of the broken chain link More