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Arsenical tough-pitch copper

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.process.c9001447
EISBN: 978-1-62708-235-8
... results in considerable embrittlement of copper. 12 The effect of antimony is controversial at the moment. According to American investigations, specimens of tough-pitch copper containing 0.02% arsenic were not subject to hot cracking, but at a content of 0.06% small cracks appeared. 16 Tellurium has...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.rail.c9001450
EISBN: 978-1-62708-231-0
... the fracture the grain boundaries were delineated as a near-continuous network of cavities and films of oxide. It was evident that the failure of the rivets in service was attributable to intergranular weakness in the material due to gassing. Boilers Gases Arsenical tough-pitch copper...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003552
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... sections and blisters on the surface of annealed or heat treated material. The principal effect of bright flakes is a reduction in short-transverse ductility. Copper and its alloys are not susceptible to attack by hydrogen, unless they contain copper oxide. Tough pitch coppers, such as C11000...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003553
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... analysis, metallographic analysis, and simulated-service tests. It provides case studies for the analysis of SCC service failures and their occurrence in steels, stainless steels, and commercial alloys of aluminum, copper, magnesium, and titanium. aluminum alloys austenitic stainless steel carbon...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006777
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
...) Improperly precipitation-hardened alloys, resulting in coarse grain-boundary precipitates and a denuded region (precipitation-free zone) Embrittlement of molybdenum by interstitials (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen) Embrittlement of copper by antimony Reduction of Cu 2 O in tough pitch copper by hydrogen...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003540
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., nitrogen, oxygen) Embrittlement of copper by antimony Reduction of Cu 2 O in tough pitch copper by hydrogen Hydrogen embrittlement by grain-boundary absorption of hydrogen Stress-corrosion cracking (sometimes) Liquid metal induced embrittlement (LMIE), for example, mercury in brass, lithium...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006784
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... ductility. Copper and its alloys are not susceptible to attack by hydrogen, unless they contain copper oxide. Tough pitch coppers, such as C11000, contain small quantities of Cu 2 O. Deoxidized coppers with low residual deoxidizer contents—C12000, for example—may contain Cu 2 O but contain less than...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006785
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... studies into the cause of season cracking, Moore, Beckinsale, and Mallinson concluded in their 1921 paper, “The Season Cracking of Brass and Other Copper Alloys,” that “some agency additional to the presence of initial (residual) stress appears to be necessary for the development of season-cracks” ( Ref 3...