1-20 of 52 Search Results for

Airfoils

Sort by
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 22 Predicted temperature using oxide depth measurements at 60% airfoil height More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 23 Predicted temperature using oxide depth measurements at 90% airfoil height More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 3 Predicted temperature using oxide depth measurements at 60% airfoil height More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 4 Predicted temperature using oxide depth measurements at 90% airfoil height More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Airfoil segment from a cast Stellite 31 turbine vane that failed by thermal fatigue. (a) and (b) Thermal fatigue cracks emanating from a leading edge and progressing along grain boundaries. The microstructure shows evidence of age hardening by intragranular precipitation of carbide More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 25 (a) Cross section of an airfoil showing a deviation in the position of the trailing-edge cooling passage as a result of casting core shift. (b) Schematic showing proper alignment More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 13 Axial deformation, i.e., bowing, in the turbine airfoil section. More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 16 Coating features of the vane along the airfoil section. (a) Convex side showing intact coating and shrinkage porosity; (b) Coating-matrix interface along convex side; (c) Vane coating and coating-matrix interface along concave side. More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.power.c0046966
EISBN: 978-1-62708-229-7
... Abstract A turbine vane made of cast cobalt-base alloy AMS 5382 (Stellite 31; composition: Co-25.5Cr-10.5Ni-7.5W) was returned from service after an undetermined number of service hours because of crack indications on the airfoil sections. This alloy is cast by the precision investment method...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.power.c0090114
EISBN: 978-1-62708-229-7
... holes' surface was not coated. Investigation supported the conclusions that the cracking at the cooling holes was due to grain-boundary oxidation and nitridation at the cooling hole surface, embrittlement and loss of local ductility of the base alloy, temperature gradient from the airfoil surface...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001366
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... Abstract An AMS 4126 (7075-T6) aluminum alloy impeller from a radial inflow turbine fractured during commissioning. Initial examination showed that two adjacent vanes had fractured through airfoils in the vicinity of the vane leading edges, and one vane fractured through an airfoil near the hub...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v03.c9001758
EISBN: 978-1-62708-241-9
... Abstract This article describes the visual, fractographic, and metallographic evidence typically encountered when analyzing stress rupture of turbine airfoils. Stress-rupture fractures are generally heavily oxidized, tend to be rough in texture, and are primarily intergranular...
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 22 (a) Photograph of stage 1 turbine blade. Material loss was most severe at the tip and trailing-edge airfoil. (b) Photograph of second-stage turbine vane. Note the rounded discoloration patterns, material loss at the trailing edge, and airfoil perforation (arrow). (c) Optical micrograph More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 16 Liquid droplet erosion from a low-pressure steam turbine blade that failed under fatigue loading. (a) Photograph of leading-edge airfoil, suction side. The lower portion of the airfoil (left) was 400-series stainless steel alloy; the upper portion of the airfoil (right) was clad More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006824
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
.... In cases where material is released in the turbine flow path, such as a broken airfoil, downstream components typically suffer secondary damage, and so the first component to fail is typically at the upstream end of the damaged zone ( Fig. 1 ). Fig. 1 Failed gas turbine rotor. From left to right...
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 2 Cracked first steps MAR-M302 Turbine engine vane in the as-received condition. (a) Concave airfoil surface; (b) Convex airfoil surface. Metallographic sampling location indicated by arrow M. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 20 Schematic of first-stage gas turbine blade that experienced cracking after 32,000 h in service. (a) Sectioning planes at three locations on the blade airfoil. (b) Cross-sectional view of the blade airfoil showing the cooling holes and numbering sequence More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Schematic of first-stage gas turbine blade that experienced cracking after 32,000 h in service. (a) Sectioning planes at three locations on the blade airfoil. (b) Cross-sectional view of the blade airfoil showing the cooling holes and numbering sequence More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 8 (a) Photograph of second-stage turbine blade, with crack location indicated by arrow. (b) Optical micrograph of lower-airfoil trailing-edge crack open to the internal surface of the blade airfoil. Etched with Marble’s reagent. (c) Finite-element strain map showing peak strain near crack More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 19 (a) Photograph of stage 2 blade after service. (b) Optical micrograph of upper airfoil leading-edge section showing intergranular oxidation and surrounding alloy depletion (white). Etched with Marble’s reagent. (c) Optical micrograph showing general oxidation damage of the airfoil More